1887

Transdisciplinarity and Microbiology Education

    Authors: Vittorio Capozzi1,*, Giuseppe Spano1, Daniela Fiocco2
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Food Science, Foggia University, Foggia, Italy; 2: Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 03 May 2012
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Food Science, University of Foggia, via Napoli, 25, 71122 Foggia, Italy. Phone: +39-0-881-589303. Fax: +39-0-881- 740211. E-mail: vittorio.capozzi@gmail.com.
    • Copyright © 2012 American Society for Microbiology
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2012 vol. 13 no. 1 70-73. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v13i1.365
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    Abstract:

    A graphical representation of the transdisciplinary pyramid, as a tool, helps us in the design of practical classroom activities that deal with transdisciplinarity, microbiology, and, more generally, with biology. As regard to classroom implementation, we propose two main practical approaches. On the one hand, we can concretize/realize transdisciplinarity through a new design of the lesson, which shall rely on a team of four teachers/professors representing disciplines from all the four levels of the pyramid. On the other hand, a class debate with a teacher–moderator shall be used as a Trojan horse to launch the insights into the newly proposed point of view. The presence of four teachers/professors provides a rigorous study of the topics together with a concretized high-quality transdisciplinarity. Conversely, the class discussion promotes student involvement and the development of critical thought.

Key Concept Ranking

Nitrogen Fixation
0.5555556
Food Microbiology
0.5429964
Microbial Ecology
0.52832085
Environmental Microbiology
0.5040837
Plant Pathogens
0.4786968
0.5555556

References & Citations

1. Ackermann M ETH Molecular Microbial Ecology Group Web Page https://www1.ethz.ch/ibp/research/molecularmicrobialecology/Research
2. Barba M, Van den Bergh I, Belisario A, Beed F 2010 The need for culture collections to support plant pathogen diagnostic networks Res. Microbiol. 161 472 479 10.1016/j.resmic.2010.04.008 20457251 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resmic.2010.04.008
3. Capozzi V, Spano G 2011 Food microbial biodiversity and “microbes of protected origin.” Front. Microbiol. 2 237 22144978 3226094
4. Daniel HM, Prasad GS 2010 The role of culture collections as an interface between providers and users: the example of yeasts Res. Microbiol. 161 488 496 10.1016/j.resmic.2010.01.011 20197089 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resmic.2010.01.011
5. Dedeurwaerdere T 2006 The institutional economics of sharing biological information Int. Soc. Sci. J. 188 351 368 10.1111/j.1468-2451.2006.00623.x http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2451.2006.00623.x
6. Dedeurwaerdere T 2010 Self-governance and international regulation of the global microbial commons: introduction to the special issue on the microbial commons Int. J. Commons. 4 390 403
7. Dijkshoorn L, De Vos P, Dedeurwaerdere T 2010 Understanding patterns of use and scientific opportunities in the emerging global microbial commons Res. Microbiol. 161 407 413 10.1016/j.resmic.2010.06.001 20599611 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resmic.2010.06.001
8. Hess C, Ostrom E 2006 A framework for analyzing the microbiological commons Int. Soc. Sci. J. 58 335 350 10.1111/j.1468-2451.2006.00622.x http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2451.2006.00622.x
9. Hirsch Hadorn G, Bradley D, Pohl C, Rist S, Wiesmann U 2006 Implications of transdisciplinarity for sustainability research Ecol. Econ. 60 119 112 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2005.12.002 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2005.12.002
10. Höfte M, Altier N 2010 Fluorescent pseudomonads as biocontrol agents for sustainable agricultural systems Res. Microbiol. 161 464 471 10.1016/j.resmic.2010.04.007 20457252 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resmic.2010.04.007
11. Jacobs University Transdisciplinarity Workshop 2011 [Home Page]. http://www.jacobs-university.de/transdisciplinarity-workshop-2011
12. Klein JT, Grossenbacher-Mansuy W, Häberli R, Bill A, Scholz RW, Welti M 2001 Transdisciplinarity: Joint problem solving among science, technology, and society: an effective way for managing complexity Birkhäuser Verlag Basel 11754131 50662
13. Lindström K, Murwira M, Willems A, Altier N 2010 The biodiversity of beneficial microbehost mutualism: the case of rhizobia Res. Microbiol. 161 453 463 10.1016/j.resmic.2010.05.005 20685242 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resmic.2010.05.005
14. Max-Neef MA 2005 Foundations of transdisciplinarity Ecol. Econ. 53 5 16 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2005.01.014 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2005.01.014
15. Moore ERB, Mihaylova SA, Vandamme P, Krichevsky MI, Dijkshoorn L 2010 Microbial systematics and taxonomy: relevance for a microbial commons Res. Microbiol. 161 430 438 10.1016/j.resmic.2010.05.007 20670913 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resmic.2010.05.007
16. Persley GJ 2000 Agricultural biotechnology and the poor: Promethean science Agricultural biotechnology and the poor: proceedings of an International Conference Washington, DC, USA 21-22 October, 1999
17. Racaniello VR 2010 Social media and microbiology education PLoS Pathog. 6 e1001095 10.1371/journal.ppat.1001095 20975949 2958816 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1001095
18. Sbarbati A, Osculati F 2006 Allelochemical communication in vertebrates: kairomones, allomones, and synomones Cells Tissues Organs 183 206 219 10.1159/000096511 17159346 http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000096511
19. Staley JT, FitzGerald K, Fuerst JA, Dijkshoorn L 2010 Microbiological material exchanges among scientists Res. Microbiol. 161 446 452 10.1016/j.resmic.2010.05.011 20558279 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resmic.2010.05.011
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v13i1.365
2012-05-03
2017-05-29

Abstract:

A graphical representation of the transdisciplinary pyramid, as a tool, helps us in the design of practical classroom activities that deal with transdisciplinarity, microbiology, and, more generally, with biology. As regard to classroom implementation, we propose two main practical approaches. On the one hand, we can concretize/realize transdisciplinarity through a new design of the lesson, which shall rely on a team of four teachers/professors representing disciplines from all the four levels of the pyramid. On the other hand, a class debate with a teacher–moderator shall be used as a Trojan horse to launch the insights into the newly proposed point of view. The presence of four teachers/professors provides a rigorous study of the topics together with a concretized high-quality transdisciplinarity. Conversely, the class discussion promotes student involvement and the development of critical thought.

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FIGURE 1

Graphical representation of the transdisciplinary pyramid, according to Max-Neef ( 14 ).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2012 vol. 13 no. 1 70-73. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v13i1.365
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