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Development of a Community-Oriented Parasitological Survey as a Teaching Strategy for Medical Students

    Author: Tatiana Ascencio1
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    Affiliations: 1: Departamento de Microbiología, Universidad Dr. José Matías Delgado, Antiguo Cuscatlan, El Salvador, Central America
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 03 May 2012
    • Supplementary materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • Author’s mailing address: Departamento de Microbiología, Universidad Dr. José Matías Delgado, Km8 1/2 Carretera a Santa Tecla. Campus 1. Edificio 4. Segunda Planta. Antiguo Cuscatlan, El Salvador, Central America. Phone: 503-227-81011 Ext. 247. Fax: 503-228-95314. E-mail: tatianaascencio@yahoo.com.
    • Copyright © 2012 American Society for Microbiology
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2012 vol. 13 no. 1 78-79. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v13i1.371
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    Abstract:

    Parasitic diseases remain a serious public health problem in developing countries, especially in such tropical countries with weak environmental sanitation as El Salvador (located in Central America), and cause health problems like anemia, cognitive disorders, and malnutrition. Antiparasitic drugs are available for treatment, but community education is also necessary to prevent these diseases. By introducing a community-oriented parasitological survey into our Medical Parasitology and Mycology course (MPM), we hypothesized that exposing students to a real-life situation would help them acquire knowledge and skills required in their professional practice. This survey is also suitable for use by clinical laboratory students, nursing students (for educational purposes on the prevention of parasitic diseases), and general biology students (because they need to know the suitable process of obtaining a stool sample and the proper diagnosis of the parasites).

Key Concept Ranking

Parasitic Diseases
1.1067027
Entamoeba histolytica
0.5833333
Sodium Hypochlorite
0.5633987
Asymptomatic Carriers
0.54061973
Parasites
0.4766309
1.1067027

References & Citations

1. Ascencio T 2011 Community-oriented parasitological survey in a Medical Parasitology and Mycology course for medical students in a Central American university as a teaching strategy to improve learning [abstract] JMBE 12 88
2. Botero D, Retrepo M 2003 Parasitosis Humanas 4 aEdición Corporación para Investigaciones Biológicas (CIB) Medellin, Colombia
3. Vasquez O, Campos T 2009 Giardiasis. La parasitosis más frecuente a nivel mundial Revista del centro de investigación Universidad La Salle Mexico 8 75 90
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2012-05-03
2017-11-20

Abstract:

Parasitic diseases remain a serious public health problem in developing countries, especially in such tropical countries with weak environmental sanitation as El Salvador (located in Central America), and cause health problems like anemia, cognitive disorders, and malnutrition. Antiparasitic drugs are available for treatment, but community education is also necessary to prevent these diseases. By introducing a community-oriented parasitological survey into our Medical Parasitology and Mycology course (MPM), we hypothesized that exposing students to a real-life situation would help them acquire knowledge and skills required in their professional practice. This survey is also suitable for use by clinical laboratory students, nursing students (for educational purposes on the prevention of parasitic diseases), and general biology students (because they need to know the suitable process of obtaining a stool sample and the proper diagnosis of the parasites).

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Materials used to promote the activity were individually distributed among the university employees.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2012 vol. 13 no. 1 78-79. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v13i1.371
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FIGURE 2

Third-year medical students speaking to university employees.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2012 vol. 13 no. 1 78-79. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v13i1.371
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FIGURE 3

Laboratory work. Students performing parasitological examination of stool samples at the School of Medicine laboratory.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2012 vol. 13 no. 1 78-79. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v13i1.371
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