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Vision and Change–ing A First-Year Biology Classroom

    Author: Gail S. Begley1
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston MA 02115
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 03 May 2012
    • Author’s mailing address: Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Mugar Life Sciences Building, Rm. 134, 360 Huntington Ave., Boston, MA 02115. Phone: 617-373-3491. Fax: 617-373-2724. E-mail: g.begley@neu.edu.
    • Copyright © 2012 American Society for Microbiology
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2012 vol. 13 no. 1 83-85. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v13i1.381
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    Abstract:

    In the recent report, the American Association for the Advancement of Science laid out a blueprint for reforming undergraduate biology education. A key component of the vision is ensuring that all students understand certain core concepts that are necessary for biological literacy, and that they are able to demonstrate a set of core competencies in disciplinary practice.

    The core concepts and competencies were integrated into every aspect of a first year Inquiries in Biology course at Northeastern University. This course is offered to students majoring in Biology, Biochemistry, and Behavioral Neuroscience who have Advanced Placement credit for General Biology. The class is small (35 students), and is organized largely in a seminar format with no textbook and very minimal lecturing. However, the integration strategies presented here should be applicable to larger classes, as well as classes that are more lecture-focused.

Key Concept Ranking

Viruses
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Gene
0.5666667
0.66424274

References & Citations

1. American Association for the Advancement of Science 2011 Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education: A Call to Action http://visionandchange.org/finalreport
2. National Research Council (NRC) 2000 How people learn: brain, mind, experience, and school, expanded edition National Academies Press Washington, D.C.
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v13i1.381
2012-05-03
2017-09-22

Abstract:

In the recent report, the American Association for the Advancement of Science laid out a blueprint for reforming undergraduate biology education. A key component of the vision is ensuring that all students understand certain core concepts that are necessary for biological literacy, and that they are able to demonstrate a set of core competencies in disciplinary practice.

The core concepts and competencies were integrated into every aspect of a first year Inquiries in Biology course at Northeastern University. This course is offered to students majoring in Biology, Biochemistry, and Behavioral Neuroscience who have Advanced Placement credit for General Biology. The class is small (35 students), and is organized largely in a seminar format with no textbook and very minimal lecturing. However, the integration strategies presented here should be applicable to larger classes, as well as classes that are more lecture-focused.

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