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The Genome Solver Website: A Virtual Space Fostering High Impact Practices for Undergraduate Biology

    Authors: Anne G. Rosenwald1,*, Janet S. Russell2, Gaurav Arora1
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology; 2: Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 03 December 2012
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Biology, Georgetown University, 37th and O Sts., NW, 406 Reiss Science Center, Washington, DC 20057. Phone: 202-687-5997. Fax: 202-687-5662. E-mail: rosenwaa@georgetown.edu.
    • Copyright © 2012 American Society for Microbiology
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2012 vol. 13 no. 2 188-190. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v13i2.444
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    Abstract:

    While the tools for analysis of prokaryotic genomes are available on the internet and are relatively easy for undergraduates to master, the challenge lies with faculty inexperienced in teaching bioinformatics. To meet this challenge we developed the Genome Solver (GS) website, a community of practice for faculty support and student learning. At the GS site, faculty can learn about face-to-face training opportunities or use the virtual training materials such as primers on the pertinent science, tools, and techniques. Faculty can also find colleagues engaged in similar work as well as relevant curricular materials. The GS site also helps facilitate sharing of student work, so that students can engage in peer-to-peer review. Finally, genomics experts also have a presence on GS and can weigh in on problems or discuss methods.

Key Concept Ranking

Horizontal Gene Transfer
0.77982086
Microbial Diversity
0.47820196
Replication Initiation
0.41590446
0.77982086

References & Citations

1. Denofrio LA, Russell B, Lopatto D, Lu Y 2007 Linking student interests to science curricula Science 318 1872 1873 10.1126/science.1150788 18096791 http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1150788
2. Gregg-Jolly LA, Kington R, Lopatto D, Swartz JE 2011 Benefits of intertwining teaching and research Science 331 532 10.1126/science.331.6017.532-a 21292954 http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.331.6017.532-a
3. Human Microbiome Project Consortium 2012 A framework for human microbiome research Nature 486 215 221 22699610
4. Human Microbiome Project Consortium 2012 Structure, function and diversity of the healthy human microbiome Nature 486 207 214 22699609
5. Lopatto D 2007 Undergraduate research experiences support science career decisions and active learning CBE-Life Sci. Educ 6 297 306 10.1187/cbe.07-06-0039 18056301 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.07-06-0039
6. Nelson KE, Weinstock GM, Highlander SK, Worley KC, Creasy HH, Wortman JR, et al 2010 A catalog of reference genomes from the human microbiome Science 328 994 999 10.1126/science.1183605 20489017 http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1183605
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2012-12-03
2017-11-25

Abstract:

While the tools for analysis of prokaryotic genomes are available on the internet and are relatively easy for undergraduates to master, the challenge lies with faculty inexperienced in teaching bioinformatics. To meet this challenge we developed the Genome Solver (GS) website, a community of practice for faculty support and student learning. At the GS site, faculty can learn about face-to-face training opportunities or use the virtual training materials such as primers on the pertinent science, tools, and techniques. Faculty can also find colleagues engaged in similar work as well as relevant curricular materials. The GS site also helps facilitate sharing of student work, so that students can engage in peer-to-peer review. Finally, genomics experts also have a presence on GS and can weigh in on problems or discuss methods.

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FIGURE 1

The Genome Solver interface.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2012 vol. 13 no. 2 188-190. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v13i2.444
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