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Using Student-Produced Time-Lapse Plant Movies to communicate concepts in Plant Biology

    Author: Marcia Harrison-Pitaniello1
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    Affiliations: 1: Biological Sciences, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 06 May 2013
    • Supplemental materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: Marshall University, Biological Sciences, One John Marshall Dr., Huntington, WV 25755. Phone: 304-696-4867. Fax: 304-696-7136. E-mail: harrison@marshall.edu.
    • ©2013 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2013 vol. 14 no. 1 101-102. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.436
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    Abstract:

    Why do students think plants are “boring”? One factor may be that they do not see plant movement in real (i.e., their) time. This attitude may negatively impact their understanding of plant biology. Time-lapse movies of plants allow students to see the sophistication of movements involved in both organ development and orientation. The objective of this project was to develop simple methods to capture image sequences for lab analysis and for converting into movies. The technology for making time-lapse movies is now easily attainable and fairly inexpensive, allowing its use for skill levels from grade school through college undergraduates. Presented are example time-lapse movie exercises from both an undergraduate plant physiology course and outreach activities. The time-lapse plant exercises are adaptable to explore numerous topics that incorporate science standards core concepts, competencies, and disciplinary practices as well as to integrate higher order thinking skills and build skills in hypothesis development and communicating results to various audiences.

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References & Citations

1. American Association for the Advancement of Science 2011 Vision and change in undergraduate biology education: a call to action American Association for the Advancement of Science Washington, DC http://visionandchange.org/finalreport.
2. Committee on a Conceptual Framework for the New K-12 Science Education Standards and the National Research Council 2012 A framework for k-12 science education: practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas The National Academies Press Washington, DC http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=13165.
3. Heer R 2012 A model of learning objectives—based on A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: a revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching, Iowa State University http://www.celt.iastate.edu/teaching/RevisedBlooms1.html.
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.436
2013-05-06
2017-05-26

Abstract:

Why do students think plants are “boring”? One factor may be that they do not see plant movement in real (i.e., their) time. This attitude may negatively impact their understanding of plant biology. Time-lapse movies of plants allow students to see the sophistication of movements involved in both organ development and orientation. The objective of this project was to develop simple methods to capture image sequences for lab analysis and for converting into movies. The technology for making time-lapse movies is now easily attainable and fairly inexpensive, allowing its use for skill levels from grade school through college undergraduates. Presented are example time-lapse movie exercises from both an undergraduate plant physiology course and outreach activities. The time-lapse plant exercises are adaptable to explore numerous topics that incorporate science standards core concepts, competencies, and disciplinary practices as well as to integrate higher order thinking skills and build skills in hypothesis development and communicating results to various audiences.

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FIGURE 1

A simple webcam set-up using a white tri-fold poster board. In this set-up, a Logitech QuickCam is mounted on a ring attached to a ring stand.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2013 vol. 14 no. 1 101-102. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.436
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