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Assessment of the Impact of the Kansas IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence Program on Undergraduate Participation in Research

    Authors: Stephen K. Chapes1,*, Sarah E. Velasquez2
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    Affiliations: 1: Divison of Biology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-4901; 2: University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66205-2522
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 06 May 2013
    • Supplemental materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Kansas State University, 116 Ackert Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506-4901. Phone: 785-532-6795. Fax: 785-532-6653. E-mail: skcbiol@ksu.edu.
    • ©2013 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2013 vol. 14 no. 1 47-57. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.492
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    Abstract:

    The Kansas IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (K-INBRE) was established in 2001 and is a network of 10 higher-education institutions in Kansas and northern Oklahoma. The program is funded by the Institutional Development Award (IDeA) program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). As part of the program’s goal to enhance the research infrastructure in Kansas, a training program was developed to encourage undergraduates to participate in biomedical research. From September 2002 to May 2012, the K-INBRE supported 731 students at 10 institutions. Although 16% of student participants in the program are still undergraduates, 323 of our students have gone into biomedical graduate school or medical school programs. Thirty-seven percent of all the completed students have matriculated into graduate programs and 19% of our completed students went to medical school. Moreover, 12% have gone into other health-related professions. One percent of our students who went into medical school programs are in highly prestigious MD/PhD programs. In the fall of 2011, we surveyed participants from the last 10 years about career choices and the impact of the K-INBRE program on those students. Two hundred twenty-four former and current students responded to the survey with a consensus of high impact of the K-INBRE program on student training, career choices, and perceptions about research.

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.492
2013-05-06
2017-08-18

Abstract:

The Kansas IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (K-INBRE) was established in 2001 and is a network of 10 higher-education institutions in Kansas and northern Oklahoma. The program is funded by the Institutional Development Award (IDeA) program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). As part of the program’s goal to enhance the research infrastructure in Kansas, a training program was developed to encourage undergraduates to participate in biomedical research. From September 2002 to May 2012, the K-INBRE supported 731 students at 10 institutions. Although 16% of student participants in the program are still undergraduates, 323 of our students have gone into biomedical graduate school or medical school programs. Thirty-seven percent of all the completed students have matriculated into graduate programs and 19% of our completed students went to medical school. Moreover, 12% have gone into other health-related professions. One percent of our students who went into medical school programs are in highly prestigious MD/PhD programs. In the fall of 2011, we surveyed participants from the last 10 years about career choices and the impact of the K-INBRE program on those students. Two hundred twenty-four former and current students responded to the survey with a consensus of high impact of the K-INBRE program on student training, career choices, and perceptions about research.

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FIGURE 1

Comparison of K-INBRE student post-baccalaureate success to other national metrics. Percent of K-INBRE students entering post-baccalaureate programs compared to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) Bachelor’s Degree Recipients 1 Year Later 1992–1993 cohort ( 13 ), the NCES 1999–2000 cohort ( 3 ), the NCES Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study 2008–2009 cohort ( 7 ), National Science Foundation Statistics ( 14 ), the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) survey 200–2010 ( 2 ), and the 2009 College Senior Survey ( 5 ). See text for details.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2013 vol. 14 no. 1 47-57. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.492
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