1887

Using Author Bylines and Concept Maps to Illustrate the Connectedness of Scientists

    Author: Min-Ken Liao1
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Biology Department, Furman University, Greenville, SC 29613
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 06 May 2013
    • Supplemental materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • Coresponding author. Mailing address: Biology Department, Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Highway, Greenville, SC 29613. Phone: 864-294-3246. Fax: 864-294-2058. E-mail: min-ken.liao@furman.edu.
    • ©2013 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2013 vol. 14 no. 1 118-120. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.527
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
  • XML
  • HTML
    21.65 Kb
  • PDF
    431.31 Kb

    Abstract:

    Incorporating reading and discussing primary articles in undergraduate courses has been shown to enhance students’ learning, stimulate their interests in science, and retain them as science majors. While instructors diligently coach students to scrutinize every section in an article thoroughly and critically, the author byline is often overlooked. In this study, the author bylines of primary articles were used to illustrate the connectedness of scientists and the collaborative nature of science. First year college students first learned how to construct a concept map and used concept maps to connect 14 scientists with 14 primary articles that these scientists authored. In doing so, students visualized and understood science as human activity and science progresses as a community effort. Pre- and post-activity questionnaires were used to evaluate whether the activity objectives were met. Students further examined the structure and organization of a primary article after the activity and they were engaged in discussions such as how research ideas developed and evolved, the advantages and disadvantages of collaborative research, the ethics of authorships, graduate schools, and careers in science. Hopefully, perceiving the authors of primary articles as real people in a social network and science as the collaborative efforts may help students see themselves being a part of the scientific advancement and inspire them to pursue careers in science.

Key Concept Ranking

Bacterial Genetics
0.91560847
Salmonella enterica
0.85
DNA Ligase
0.5678368
0.91560847

References & Citations

1. Hoskins SG, Stevens LM, Nehm RH 2007 Selective use of the primary literature transforms the classroom into a virtual laboratory Genetics 176 1381 1389 10.1534/genetics.107.071183 17483426 1931557 http://dx.doi.org/10.1534/genetics.107.071183
2. Maloy S, Hughes KT, Casadesús J 2011 The lure of bacterial genetics: a tribute to John Roth ASM Press Washington, DC
jmbe.v14i1.527.citations
jmbe/14/1
content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.527
Loading

Citations loading...

Supplemental Material

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.527
2013-05-06
2017-07-21

Abstract:

Incorporating reading and discussing primary articles in undergraduate courses has been shown to enhance students’ learning, stimulate their interests in science, and retain them as science majors. While instructors diligently coach students to scrutinize every section in an article thoroughly and critically, the author byline is often overlooked. In this study, the author bylines of primary articles were used to illustrate the connectedness of scientists and the collaborative nature of science. First year college students first learned how to construct a concept map and used concept maps to connect 14 scientists with 14 primary articles that these scientists authored. In doing so, students visualized and understood science as human activity and science progresses as a community effort. Pre- and post-activity questionnaires were used to evaluate whether the activity objectives were met. Students further examined the structure and organization of a primary article after the activity and they were engaged in discussions such as how research ideas developed and evolved, the advantages and disadvantages of collaborative research, the ethics of authorships, graduate schools, and careers in science. Hopefully, perceiving the authors of primary articles as real people in a social network and science as the collaborative efforts may help students see themselves being a part of the scientific advancement and inspire them to pursue careers in science.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmbe/14/1/jmbe-14-118.xml.a.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.527&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

Click to view

FIGURE 1

A concept map generated from this activity.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2013 vol. 14 no. 1 118-120. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.527
Download as Powerpoint

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error