1887

Impact of a service-Learning Project on student success in Allied Health Microbiology course

    Author: Donna M. Cain1
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology, Collin College, McKinney, TX 75071
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 06 May 2013
    • Supplemental materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Biology, Collin College, 2200 West University Boulevard, McKinney, TX 75071. Phone: 972-548-6781. Fax: 214-491-6272. E-mail: dcain@collin.edu.
    • ©2013 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2013 vol. 14 no. 1 129-130. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.541
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
  • HTML
    20.60 Kb
  • PDF
    249.00 Kb
  • XML

    Abstract:

    Education research shows many benefits of involving students in service learning. However, designing service-learning projects for science courses such as microbiology can be problematic. This article describes an effective, easily adapted project design that gets allied-health microbiology students to apply classroom knowledge towards educating the general public about infectious diseases.

Key Concept Ranking

Clostridium difficile
0.625
0.625

References & Citations

1. Abes ES, Jackson G, Jones SR 2002 Factors that motivate and deter faculty use of service-learning Michigan J Comm Service Learn 9 5 17
2. Kuh GD 2008 High-impact educational practices: What they are, who has access to them, and why they matter Association of American Colleges and Universities Washington, DC
3. Ryan M 2012 Service-learning after learn and serve America: how five states are moving forward Education Commission of the States Denver, CO
jmbe.v14i1.541.citations
jmbe/14/1
content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.541
Loading

Citations loading...

Supplemental Material

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.541
2013-05-06
2017-07-21

Abstract:

Education research shows many benefits of involving students in service learning. However, designing service-learning projects for science courses such as microbiology can be problematic. This article describes an effective, easily adapted project design that gets allied-health microbiology students to apply classroom knowledge towards educating the general public about infectious diseases.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmbe/14/1/jmbe-14-129.xml.a.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v14i1.541&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error