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A Survey Tool for Assessing Student Expectations Early in a Semester

    Authors: Karl R. B. Schmitt1, Elise A. Larsen1, Matthew Miller1, Abdel-Hameed A. Badawy2, Mara Dougherty1, Artesha Taylor Sharma1, Katie Hrapczynski1, Andrea Andrew1, Breanne Robertson1, Alexis Williams1, Sabrina Kramer1, Spencer Benson1,3,*
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: University of Maryland, Center for Teaching Excellence, College Park, MD 20742; 2: Arkansas Tech University, Russellville, AR 72801; 3: University of Macau, Centre for Teaching and Learning Enhancement, Macau, SAR China
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 02 December 2013
    • Supplemental materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Center for Teaching Excellence, Marie Mount Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. Phone: 301-404-9368. Fax: 301-314-0385. E-mail: sbenson@umd.edu.
    • ©2013 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2013 vol. 14 no. 2 255-257. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v14i2.581
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    Abstract:

    Quality learning is fostered when faculty members are aware of and address student expectations for course learning activities and assessments. However, faculty often have difficulty identifying and addressing student expectations given variations in students’ backgrounds, experiences, and beliefs about education. Prior research has described significant discrepancies between student and faculty expectations that result from cultural backgrounds (1), technological expertise (2), and ‘teaching dimensions’ as described by Trudeau and Barnes (4). Such studies illustrate the need for tools to identify and index student expectations, which can be used to facilitate a dialogue between instructor and students. Here we present the results of our work to develop, refine, and deploy such a tool.

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References & Citations

1. Collier PJ, Morgan DL 2007 ‘Is that paper really due today?’: differences in first-generation and traditional college students’ understandings of faculty expectations Higher Educ 55 425 446 10.1007/s10734-007-9065-5 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10734-007-9065-5
2. Foral PA, et al 2010 Faculty and student expectations and perceptions of e-mail communication in a campus and distance doctor of pharmacy program Am J Pharm Educ 74 1 10 10.5688/aj7410191 http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/aj7410191
3. Suchman E, Uchiyama K, Smith R, Bender K 2006 Evaluating the impact of a classroom response system in a microbiology course Microbiol Educ 7 3 11 23653562 3633139
4. Trudeau GP, Barnes KJ 2011 Shared expectations: identifying similarities and differences between student and faculty teaching values based on student evaluation of faculty classroom performance International Business & Economics Research Journal (IBER) 1 67 79
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2013-12-02
2017-09-22

Abstract:

Quality learning is fostered when faculty members are aware of and address student expectations for course learning activities and assessments. However, faculty often have difficulty identifying and addressing student expectations given variations in students’ backgrounds, experiences, and beliefs about education. Prior research has described significant discrepancies between student and faculty expectations that result from cultural backgrounds (1), technological expertise (2), and ‘teaching dimensions’ as described by Trudeau and Barnes (4). Such studies illustrate the need for tools to identify and index student expectations, which can be used to facilitate a dialogue between instructor and students. Here we present the results of our work to develop, refine, and deploy such a tool.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1.

Survey results for a 200-level General Microbiology class. The black bars show the percentage of students who expected the pedagogical tool to be used in the class. The gray bars show the percentage of students reporting that the tool was important (valued) for their learning.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2013 vol. 14 no. 2 255-257. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v14i2.581
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