1887

An Argument and Plan for Promoting the Teaching and Learning of Neglected Tropical Diseases

    Author: Kevin M. Bonney1
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biological Sciences, Kingsborough Community College, Brooklyn, NY 11235-2398
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 02 December 2013
    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Biological Sciences, Kingsborough Community College, 2001 Oriental Boulevard, Brooklyn, NY 11235-2398. Phone: 718-368-6753. Fax: 718-368-4873. E-mail: [email protected].
    • ©2013 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2013 vol. 14 no. 2 183-188. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v14i2.631
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
  • PDF
    191.96 Kb
  • HTML
    41.87 Kb
  • XML

    Abstract:

    Neglected tropical diseases constitute a significant public health burden, affecting over one billion people globally, yet this group of diseases is underrepresented in the appropriation of both monetary and intellectual capital for developing improved therapies and public health campaigns. The topic of neglected tropical diseases has been similarly marginalized in the biology classrooms of our nation’s high schools and colleges, despite offering an opportunity to teach and learn about a diverse area of microbiology with far-reaching public health, social, and economic implications. Discussed herein is an argument for increasing the representation of neglected tropical diseases in microbiology education as a means to generate increased interest in these diseases among the generation of future researchers and policy-makers, and to promote interdisciplinary learning, civic engagement, and critical thinking.

Key Concept Ranking

Human African Trypanosomiasis
0.81842536
Infectious Diseases
0.7717794
Lymphatic Filariasis
0.52680254
Dengue Fever
0.50798815
0.81842536

References & Citations

1. Aguirre KM 2007 The unfortunate nurse: a case study of Dengue fever and social policy National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science Case Collection University of Buffalo Buffalo, NY [Online.] http://sciencecases.lib.buffalo.edu/cs/files/dengue.pdf.
2. Anderson LW, Krathwohl D 2000 A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: a revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives, Complete edition Longman Publishing Group, White Plains New York
3. Bonney KM 2013 African illness: a case of parasites? National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science Case Collection University of Buffalo Buffalo, NY [Online.] http://sciencecases.lib.buffalo.edu/cs/files/safari.pdf.
4. Bonney KM 2012 Sick on a South American sugarcane plantation National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science Case Collection University of Buffalo Buffalo, NY [Online.] http://sciencecases.lib.buffalo.edu/cs/files/sugarcane_plantation.pdf.
5. Cantey PT, et al 2012 The United States Trypanosoma cruzi infection study: evidence for vector-borne transmission of the parasite that causes Chagas disease among United States blood donors Transfusion 52 1922 1930 10.1111/j.1537-2995.2012.03581.x 22404755 http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1537-2995.2012.03581.x
6. Center for Food Security and Public Health, Iowa State University 2011 Echinococcosis [Online.] http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/Factsheets/pdfs/echinococcosis.pdf.
7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2011 Neglected Tropical Diseases [Online.] http://www.cdc.gov/globalhealth/ntd/.
8. Global Brigades 2013 Public Health Brigades [Online.] http://www.globalbrigades.org/public-health-methodology.
9. Hotez PJ 2008 Forgotten people, forgotten diseases: the neglected tropical diseases and their impact on global health and development ASM Press Washington, DC
10. Hotez PJ 2008 Neglected infections of poverty in the United States of America PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2 e256 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000256 18575621 2430531 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0000256
11. Ivanitskaya L, et al 2002 Interdisciplinary learning: process and outcomes Innovative Higher Educ 27 95 111 Springer Netherlands Houten, Netherlands 10.1023/A:1021105309984 http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1021105309984
12. Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS 2011 Global AIDS response progress reporting 2012 [Online.] http://www.unaids.org/documents/20101123_GlobalReport_Chap2_em.pdf.
13. Kessler DA, et al 2013 Results of lookback for Chagas disease since the inception of donor screening at New York Blood Center Transfusion 53 1083 1087 10.1111/j.1537-2995.2012.03856.x http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1537-2995.2012.03856.x
14. Lattuca LR, et al 2004 Does interdisciplinarity promote learning? Theoretical support and researchable questions Rev Higher Educ 28 23 48 10.1353/rhe.2004.0028 http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/rhe.2004.0028
15. National Center for Biotechnology 2013 [Online.] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed.
16. Norris J, et al 2012 Social and economic impact review on neglected tropical diseases Hudson Institute’s Center for Science in Public Policy [Online.] http://www.hudson.org/.
17. Rusch HL, Perry J 2011 Dengue in the landscape National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science Case Collection University of Buffalo Buffalo, NY [Online.] http://sciencecases.lib.buffalo.edu/cs/files/dengue_jamaica.pdf.
18. Santanello CR, Rehg J 2006 The case of a tropical disease and its treatment National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science Case Collection University of Buffalo Buffalo, NY [Online.] http://sciencecases.lib.buffalo.edu/cs/files/chagas.pdf.
19. Tropical Disease Research Program International Research Training Workshop in Ecuador 2013 Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine Ohio University [Online.] http://www.oucom.ohiou.edu/tdi/InternationalResearch/InternationalResearch.htm.
20. World Health Organization 2013 Neglected Tropical Diseases [Online.] http://www.who.int/neglected_diseases/diseases/en/.

Supplemental Material

No supplementary material available for this content.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v14i2.631
2013-12-02
2019-03-20

Abstract:

Neglected tropical diseases constitute a significant public health burden, affecting over one billion people globally, yet this group of diseases is underrepresented in the appropriation of both monetary and intellectual capital for developing improved therapies and public health campaigns. The topic of neglected tropical diseases has been similarly marginalized in the biology classrooms of our nation’s high schools and colleges, despite offering an opportunity to teach and learn about a diverse area of microbiology with far-reaching public health, social, and economic implications. Discussed herein is an argument for increasing the representation of neglected tropical diseases in microbiology education as a means to generate increased interest in these diseases among the generation of future researchers and policy-makers, and to promote interdisciplinary learning, civic engagement, and critical thinking.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmbe/14/2/jmbe-14-183.xml.a.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v14i2.631&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error