1887

Molecular Twister: A Game for Exploring Solution Chemistry

    Authors: Sawyer R. Masonjones1, Heather D. Masonjones2,*, Megan C. Malone3, Ann H. Williams2, Margaret M. Beemer4, Rebecca J. Waggett2
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Biology Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32601; 2: Biology Department, University of Tampa, Tampa, FL 33606; 3: Riverview High School, Riverview, FL 33569; 4: Sky Ridge Medical Center, Lone Tree, CO 80124
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 01 May 2014
    • Supplemental materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: University of Tampa, Box U, 401 W. Kennedy Blvd., Tampa, FL 33606. Phone: 813-257-3801. Fax: 813-258-7496. E-mail: hmasonjones@ut.edu.
    • ©2014 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2014 vol. 15 no. 1 43-44. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v15i1.652
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    Abstract:

    pH is an essential biological concept with critical importance at various scales, from the molecular level, dealing with blood buffers, homeostasis, and proton gradients, all the way up to the ecosystem level, with soil chemistry and acid rain. However, pH is also a concept that spawns student misconceptions and misunderstanding in terms of what is happening in a solution on the atomic level. The Molecular Twister game, created for a Florida Department of Education funded professional development workshop for Florida high school teachers hosted at the University of Tampa (Science Math Masters), seeks to model pH in such a way that students can visually and kinesthetically learn the concept in a few minutes. In addition, the basic design of the game pieces allow for teaching extensions to include more complex acid-base reactions. Challenge questions are provided to allow teachers to bring relevancy to the game, using examples of acid-base chemistry pulled from cases in human health and the environment.

Key Concept Ranking

Hydrogen
0.9759694
Oxygen
0.76894563
Soil
0.65625
0.9759694

References & Citations

1. Demircioglu G, Ayas A, Demircioglu H 2005 Conceptual change achieved through a new teaching program on acids and bases Chem. Educ. Res. Pract 6 1 36 51 10.1039/b4rp90003k http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/b4rp90003k
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v15i1.652
2014-05-01
2017-04-25

Abstract:

pH is an essential biological concept with critical importance at various scales, from the molecular level, dealing with blood buffers, homeostasis, and proton gradients, all the way up to the ecosystem level, with soil chemistry and acid rain. However, pH is also a concept that spawns student misconceptions and misunderstanding in terms of what is happening in a solution on the atomic level. The Molecular Twister game, created for a Florida Department of Education funded professional development workshop for Florida high school teachers hosted at the University of Tampa (Science Math Masters), seeks to model pH in such a way that students can visually and kinesthetically learn the concept in a few minutes. In addition, the basic design of the game pieces allow for teaching extensions to include more complex acid-base reactions. Challenge questions are provided to allow teachers to bring relevancy to the game, using examples of acid-base chemistry pulled from cases in human health and the environment.

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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1.

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FIGURE 1.

Photo of headband components, including 8 electron flags (left), 3 5-cm hydrogen atoms, and 3 positive charge patches, with bottom displaying headband itself.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2014 vol. 15 no. 1 43-44. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v15i1.652
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Image of FIGURE 2.

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FIGURE 2.

Photo solution kit showing hydroxide, water, and hydronium from top to bottom.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2014 vol. 15 no. 1 43-44. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v15i1.652
Download as Powerpoint

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