1887

Using Soxhlet Ethanol Extraction to Produce and Test Plant Material (Essential Oils) for Their Antimicrobial Properties

    Authors: James Redfern1, Malcolm Kinninmonth1, Dariel Burdass2, Joanna Verran1,*
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    Affiliations: 1: School of Health Care Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK; 2: Society for General Microbiology, Reading, UK
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 01 May 2014
    • Supplemental materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: School of Healthcare Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Chester St., Manchester M1 5GD, UK. Phone: 44-161-247-1206. Fax: 44-161-247-6840. E-mail: j.verran@mmu.ac.uk.
    • ©2014 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2014 vol. 15 no. 1 45-46. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v15i1.656
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    Abstract:

    As the issue of antimicrobial resistance continues to grow, there is a renewed interest in deriving antimicrobial products from natural compounds, particularly extracts from plant materials. This paper describes how essential oil can be extracted from the common herb, thyme () in the classroom. Subsequently, the extract can be tested for its antimicrobial activity. A number of variables are suggested.

Key Concept Ranking

Escherichia coli
0.55
Staphylococcus aureus
0.55
Escherichia coli
0.55
Staphylococcus aureus
0.55
Escherichia coli
0.55
Staphylococcus aureus
0.55
Antimicrobial Resistance
0.5362903
0.55

References & Citations

1. Burdass D, Grainger J, Hurst J 2006 Basic practical microbiology Society for General Microbiology, Reading United Kingdom
2. Cavanagh HMA, Wilkinson JM 2002 Biological activities of lavender essential oil Phytotherapy Res 16 4 301 308 10.1002/ptr.1103 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.1103
3. Haitham Q 2009 Antibacterial activity in vitro of Thymus capitatus from Jordan Pak. J. Pharm. Sci 22 3 247 251
4. Hammer KA, Carson CF, Riley TV 1999 Antimicrobial activity of essential oils and other plant extracts J. Appl. Microbiol 86 6 985 990 10.1046/j.1365-2672.1999.00780.x 10438227 http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2672.1999.00780.x
5. Hawthorne SB, Krieger MS, Miller DJ 1988 Analysis of flavor and fragrance compounds using supercritical fluid extraction coupled with gas chromatography Analytical Chem 60 5 472 477 10.1021/ac00156a020 http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ac00156a020
6. Luque de Castro MD, García-Ayuso LE 1998 Soxhlet extraction of solid materials: an outdated technique with a promising innovative future Analytica Chimica Acta 369 1–2 1 10 10.1016/S0003-2670(98)00233-5 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0003-2670(98)00233-5
7. Metcalfe J 1993 Culpper guides: herbs and aromatherapy Bloomsbury Books London, United Kingdom
8. Thormar H 2011 Front matter Thormar H Lipids and essential oils as antimicrobial agents i xvii John Wiley & Sons, Ltd Chichester, United Kingdom
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v15i1.656
2014-05-01
2017-11-18

Abstract:

As the issue of antimicrobial resistance continues to grow, there is a renewed interest in deriving antimicrobial products from natural compounds, particularly extracts from plant materials. This paper describes how essential oil can be extracted from the common herb, thyme () in the classroom. Subsequently, the extract can be tested for its antimicrobial activity. A number of variables are suggested.

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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1.

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FIGURE 1.

Diagram of Soxhlet extraction equipment.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2014 vol. 15 no. 1 45-46. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v15i1.656
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Image of FIGURE 2.

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FIGURE 2.

An example of zones of inhibition produced from extracted thyme plant material after 16 hours ethanol Soxhlet extraction on test organisms (left) and (right).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2014 vol. 15 no. 1 45-46. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v15i1.656
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