1887

A Modified Challenge-Based Learning Approach in a Capstone Course to Improve Student Satisfaction and Engagement

    Author: Scott E. Gabriel1
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Chemistry Department, Viterbo University, La Crosse, WI 54601
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 15 December 2014
    • Supplemental materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: 900 Viterbo Drive, Viterbo University, La Crosse, WI 54601. Phone: 608-796-3473. Fax: 608-796-3050. E-mail address: segabriel@viterbo.edu.
    • ©2014 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2014 vol. 15 no. 2 316-318. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.742
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
  • XML
  • HTML
    21.03 Kb
  • PDF
    215.40 Kb

    Abstract:

    Advanced Biochemistry, a senior capstone course for biochemistry majors, was first offered in 2011. The course objectives focused on students’ ability to access and use primary literature. Despite engaging conversation and excellent student presentations, evaluations of the course content were lower than what this instructor usually receives (3.65/5 compared to 4.3/5 from the previous semester). However, the evaluation of just the instructor was equivalent to historical results. In an effort to improve the course, a challenge-based learning (CBL) design was implemented in 2013 to frame the course around four big questions relevant to our world and local community. This change was made to test if a CBL course design would increase student engagement in the course and therefore their achievement of learning outcomes. Collected data show an improvement in students’ perception of the course. Most significantly, course evaluation results increased when compared to the previous year (4.5/5 as compared to 3.65/5 in 2011). Students also rated the CBL approach as highly effective in achieving core course outcomes and related skills (all queried outcomes averaged 4.2/5 at midterm).

Key Concept Ranking

Influenza
1.0
Fig
0.70979595
Spring
0.70979595
Adaptation
0.5493651
1.0

References & Citations

1. Freeman S, et al 2014 Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 111 8410 8415 10.1073/pnas.1319030111 24821756 4060654 http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1319030111
2. Johnson L, Adams S 2011 Challenge Based Learning: The Report from the Implementation Project The New Media Consortium Austin, TX
jmbe.v15i2.742.citations
jmbe/15/2
content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.742
Loading

Citations loading...

Supplemental Material

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.742
2014-12-15
2017-11-18

Abstract:

Advanced Biochemistry, a senior capstone course for biochemistry majors, was first offered in 2011. The course objectives focused on students’ ability to access and use primary literature. Despite engaging conversation and excellent student presentations, evaluations of the course content were lower than what this instructor usually receives (3.65/5 compared to 4.3/5 from the previous semester). However, the evaluation of just the instructor was equivalent to historical results. In an effort to improve the course, a challenge-based learning (CBL) design was implemented in 2013 to frame the course around four big questions relevant to our world and local community. This change was made to test if a CBL course design would increase student engagement in the course and therefore their achievement of learning outcomes. Collected data show an improvement in students’ perception of the course. Most significantly, course evaluation results increased when compared to the previous year (4.5/5 as compared to 3.65/5 in 2011). Students also rated the CBL approach as highly effective in achieving core course outcomes and related skills (all queried outcomes averaged 4.2/5 at midterm).

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmbe/15/2/jmbe-15-316.xml.a.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.742&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1.

Click to view

FIGURE 1.

Student survey data measuring student satisfaction with CBL (first two columns) and their perception of the level of skill in a variety of areas as a result of the using CBL in class (last five columns). All results use a Likert scale with 5 being very strong and 1 being very weak (n=7).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2014 vol. 15 no. 2 316-318. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.742
Download as Powerpoint

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error