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Evaluation in RCR Training—Are You Achieving What You Hope For?

    Author: Richard McGee1
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    Affiliations: 1: Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60611
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 15 December 2014
    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 430 East Superior Street, Rubloff 647, Chicago, IL 60611. Phone: 312-503-1737. Fax: 312-503-5055. E-mail: r-mcgee@northwestern.edu.
    • ©2014 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2014 vol. 15 no. 2 117-119. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.853
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    Abstract:

    This Perspective addresses the value of, and realistic approaches to, incorporating formal evaluation processes in Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training. It comes from the experiences of a career that has combined: leading research teams and directing Ph.D. and M.D./Ph.D. training; teaching RCR since it was first required by NIH; teaching evaluation methods to directors of RCR and research training programs; and serving as an external evaluator for RCR and research training programs. Approaches to evaluation are introduced, contrasting quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods, along with the differences between formative (process) and summative (outcome) evaluation. Practical and realistic approaches are presented, knowing that RCR programs seldom have the luxury of time and funding for extensive evaluation. Guidance is provided on how to make sure evaluation starts from and focuses on what the training is designed to achieve (in terms of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors) rather than just what activities are taking place or what information is being ‘delivered.’ Examples of evaluation questions that might be asked about RCR programs are provided, as well as approaches to answering them.

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References & Citations

1. McGee R, Almquist J, Keller JL, Jacobsen S2008Teaching and learning responsible research conduct: influences of prior experiences and conflicting messagesAccount Res15306210.1080/0898962070178375818298028 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08989620701783758
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2014-12-15
2017-09-25

Abstract:

This Perspective addresses the value of, and realistic approaches to, incorporating formal evaluation processes in Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training. It comes from the experiences of a career that has combined: leading research teams and directing Ph.D. and M.D./Ph.D. training; teaching RCR since it was first required by NIH; teaching evaluation methods to directors of RCR and research training programs; and serving as an external evaluator for RCR and research training programs. Approaches to evaluation are introduced, contrasting quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods, along with the differences between formative (process) and summative (outcome) evaluation. Practical and realistic approaches are presented, knowing that RCR programs seldom have the luxury of time and funding for extensive evaluation. Guidance is provided on how to make sure evaluation starts from and focuses on what the training is designed to achieve (in terms of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors) rather than just what activities are taking place or what information is being ‘delivered.’ Examples of evaluation questions that might be asked about RCR programs are provided, as well as approaches to answering them.

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