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How Journals and Institutions Can Work Together to Promote Responsible Conduct

    Author: Eric C. Mah1
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    Affiliations: 1: Interim Chief Ethics & Compliance Officer, Research Integrity Officer, and Senior Director, Research Compliance, University of California, San Francisco
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 15 December 2014
    • aFor the purposes of this discussion, I shall focus only on the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations pertaining to research integrity, which applies to PHS-supported institutions.
      bSee specifically: §93.108 “Disclosure of the identity of respondents and complainants in research misconduct proceedings is limited, to the extent possible, to those who need to know, consistent with a thorough, competent, objective and fair research misconduct proceeding, and as allowed by law.” In addition, “Disclosure is limited to those who have a need to know to carry out a research misconduct proceeding” (45 CFR §93.108). §93.300(d) “Institutions [must]… take all reasonable and practical steps to protect the positions and reputations of good faith complainants, witnesses and committee members and protect them from retaliation by respondents and other institutional members” (45 CFR §93.300[d]). §93.411 “When a final HHS action results in a settlement or research misconduct finding, ORI may: …(b) Identify publications which require correction or retraction and prepare and send a notice to the relevant journal. (c) Publish notice of the research misconduct findings” (45 CFR §93.411).
    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: University of California, 3333 California Street, Suite 295, San Francisco, CA 94118, Phone: 415-502-0284. Fax: 415-476-4099. E-mail: eric.mah@ucsf.edu.
    • ©2014 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2014 vol. 15 no. 2 143-145. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.869
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    Abstract:

    Little has been published on how institutions and journals can work together in an increasingly visible arena of research misconduct. The investigatory process can be challenged with the scientific community's need or want to know about allegations and findings of misconduct. This article explores how journals and institutions have different perspectives and possible ways institutions and journals can cooperate.

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References & Citations

1. Michalek AM, Hutson AD, Wicher CP, Trump DL 2010 The costs and underappreciated consequences of research misconduct: a case study PLoS Med 7 8 e1000318 10.1371/journal.pmed.1000318 20808955 2923086 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1000318
2. Reich ES 17 August 2010 High price to pay for misconduct investigations Nature [Online.] http://www.nature.com/news/2010/100817/full/news.2010.414.html
3. Stern A, Casadevall A, Steen RG, Fang FC 2014 Financial costs and personal consequences of research misconduct resulting in retracted publications eLife 2014 3 e02956 25124673 4132287
4. Wager E, Kleinert S 2012 Cooperation between research institutions and journals on research integrity cases: guidance from the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) [Online.] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3541569/
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.869
2014-12-15
2017-09-20

Abstract:

Little has been published on how institutions and journals can work together in an increasingly visible arena of research misconduct. The investigatory process can be challenged with the scientific community's need or want to know about allegations and findings of misconduct. This article explores how journals and institutions have different perspectives and possible ways institutions and journals can cooperate.

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