1887

The Role of Philosophers in RCR Training

    Author: Gary Comstock1
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8103
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 15 December 2014
    • aThis article is an abridged, slightly modified version of the Introduction to G. Comstock, ( 2 ). Reprinted with permission of Cambridge University Press.
    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, 340 Withers Hall, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8103. Phone: 919-515-3214. E-mail: gcomstock@ncsu.edu.
    • ©2014 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2014 vol. 15 no. 2 139-142. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.871
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    Abstract:

    The expanding moral circle lends coherence to the usual hodge-podge of canonical RCR topics. As it is in a person’s own interest to report falsification, understand fabrication, avoid plagiarism, beware of intuition, and justify one’s decisions, it is useful to begin RCR discussions with the principle that As it is in the interest of a person’s research group to articulate their reasons for their conclusions, to write cooperatively, review manuscripts professionally, and report statistics transparently, one can introduce the principle that As it is a basic matter of rights to respect human subjects, mentor inclusively, recognize intellectual property, and reveal both conflicts of interests and collaborations with private industry, an RCR instructor can introduce the idea that Finally, as many animals can feel pain, are subjects of their own lives, and have interests of their own, we must take seriously our role in their welfare as research subjects. In this last step, we expand the circle fully, considering animal experimentation, duties to future generations and the natural environment, and the larger social responsibilities of researchers while adopting a utilitarian principle:

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References & Citations

1. Anderson MS 20 May 2009 Supply and demand in RCR instruction. PSI (Project for Scholarly Integrity) [Online.] http://www.scholarlyintegrity.org/Blog.aspx?blogmonth=5&blogyear=2009&blogid=544
2. Comstock G 2012 Research ethics: a philosophical guide to the responsible conduct of research Cambridge University Press Cambridge, UK 10.1017/CBO9780511902703 http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511902703
3. Hare RM 1981 Moral thinking: its levels, methods and point Oxford University Press New York, NY 10.1093/0198246609.001.0001 http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0198246609.001.0001
4. Singer P 1981 The expanding circle: ethics and sociobiology Farrar, Straus & Giroux New York, NY
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2014-12-15
2017-03-26

Abstract:

The expanding moral circle lends coherence to the usual hodge-podge of canonical RCR topics. As it is in a person’s own interest to report falsification, understand fabrication, avoid plagiarism, beware of intuition, and justify one’s decisions, it is useful to begin RCR discussions with the principle that As it is in the interest of a person’s research group to articulate their reasons for their conclusions, to write cooperatively, review manuscripts professionally, and report statistics transparently, one can introduce the principle that As it is a basic matter of rights to respect human subjects, mentor inclusively, recognize intellectual property, and reveal both conflicts of interests and collaborations with private industry, an RCR instructor can introduce the idea that Finally, as many animals can feel pain, are subjects of their own lives, and have interests of their own, we must take seriously our role in their welfare as research subjects. In this last step, we expand the circle fully, considering animal experimentation, duties to future generations and the natural environment, and the larger social responsibilities of researchers while adopting a utilitarian principle:

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FIGURE 1.

The expanding moral circle.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2014 vol. 15 no. 2 139-142. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.871
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FIGURE 2.

RCR topics organized according to the expanding moral circle metaphor.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2014 vol. 15 no. 2 139-142. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.871
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