1887

Practical Bioremediation Course – Laboratory Exercises on Biodegradation of Cationic Surfactant

    Authors: Tomislav Ivankovic1,*, Maja Mejdandzic2, Sandra Postic2, Nikola Malesevic2, Jasna Hrenovic1
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia; 2: Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 01 May 2015
    • Supplemental materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Microbiology, Division of Biology, PMF, Rooseveltov trg 6, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia. Phone: 003851 4877 700. Fax: 003851 4826 260. E-mail: tomislav.ivankovic@biol.pmf.hr.
    • ©2015 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 69-71. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.787
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
  • HTML
    26.22 Kb
  • XML
  • PDF
    1.18 MB

    Abstract:

    From the perspective of the lab exercises leader and teaching assistant for the Bioremediation course, it was very difficult to design and conduct a set of exercises that would fit the course curriculum and satisfactorily demonstrate bioremediation basics through practical laboratory work. Thus, Bioremediation course students designed the experiment with the help of the teaching assistant; a simulation of possible bioremediation of “Jarun” lake in Zagreb, Croatia, if contaminated with cationic surfactant. The experiment nicely showed how natural bioremediation differs from engineered bioremediation and the levels of success between different types of engineered bioremediation. The laboratory exercises were designed to be interesting and the results perceivable to the students.

Key Concept Ranking

Quaternary Ammonium Compounds
0.4520361
Wastewater Treatment Plants
0.44557846
Lake Water
0.44165084
Benzalkonium Chloride
0.43333337
0.4520361

References & Citations

1. Nye JV, Guerin WF, Boyd SA1994Heterotrophic activity of microorganisms in soils treated with quaternary ammonium compoundsEnviron Sci Technol2894495110.1021/es00054a02922191839 http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es00054a029
jmbe.v16i1.787.citations
jmbe/16/1
content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.787
Loading

Citations loading...

Supplemental Material

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.787
2015-05-01
2017-11-20

Abstract:

From the perspective of the lab exercises leader and teaching assistant for the Bioremediation course, it was very difficult to design and conduct a set of exercises that would fit the course curriculum and satisfactorily demonstrate bioremediation basics through practical laboratory work. Thus, Bioremediation course students designed the experiment with the help of the teaching assistant; a simulation of possible bioremediation of “Jarun” lake in Zagreb, Croatia, if contaminated with cationic surfactant. The experiment nicely showed how natural bioremediation differs from engineered bioremediation and the levels of success between different types of engineered bioremediation. The laboratory exercises were designed to be interesting and the results perceivable to the students.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmbe/16/1/jmbe-16-69.xml.a.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.787&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1.

Click to view

FIGURE 1.

Schematic diagram of Exercises 3–5. MSM = mineral salt medium; BAC = benzalkonium chloride.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 69-71. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.787
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 2.

Click to view

FIGURE 2.

Aeration apparatus. The bottles were covered with food wrapping plastic foil and sealed with adhesive tape. The air is powered with aquarium pumps through serological pipettes.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 69-71. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.787
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 3.

Click to view

FIGURE 3.

Filtration of samples for BAC measurement using syringe nitrocellulose filters (pore size 0.2 μm). BAC = benzalkonium chloride.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 69-71. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.787
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 4.

Click to view

FIGURE 4.

Measuring the concentration of BAC in lake water samples. BAC = benzalkonium chloride.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 69-71. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.787
Download as Powerpoint

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error