1887

Using Lecture Demonstrations to Visualize Biological Concepts

    Authors: Kristin Polizzotto1, Farshad Tamari1,*
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biological Sciences, Kingsborough Community College, Brooklyn, New York, 11235
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 01 May 2015
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Biological Sciences, Kingsborough Community College, 2001 Oriental Boulevard, Brooklyn, New York 11235. Phone: 718-368-5726. Fax: 718-368-4873. E-mail: farshad.tamari@kbcc.cuny.edu.
    • ©2015 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 79-81. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.840
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    Abstract:

    Teaching complex biology concepts successfully can be challenging. The use of visual demonstrations has been shown to aid in this process, so we describe here two lecture demonstrations that instructors can use in introductory biology and genetics classes, and that students can easily remember and repeat on their own. The demonstrations do not require expensive equipment and use either props, which the instructor can borrow from the students, or participation of volunteer students. These demonstrations facilitate learning by allowing the student to more actively engage in the process, as we have formally documented in a separate study. They are described in detail here with the hope that other instructors and their students will also find them helpful. Three other props demonstrations for DNA replication, protein structure and linkage can be found using the url: https://sites.google.com/site/tamarif26. The effectiveness of the five props demonstrations was assessed. The results from an IRB approved study, which complements the descriptions provided here, also appear in this issue.

Key Concept Ranking

Amino Acids
0.7187884
DNA Replication
0.458699
Nucleic Acids
0.4566597
Palmitic Acid
0.44595733
Fatty Acids
0.4120238
0.7187884

References & Citations

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.840
2015-05-01
2017-05-24

Abstract:

Teaching complex biology concepts successfully can be challenging. The use of visual demonstrations has been shown to aid in this process, so we describe here two lecture demonstrations that instructors can use in introductory biology and genetics classes, and that students can easily remember and repeat on their own. The demonstrations do not require expensive equipment and use either props, which the instructor can borrow from the students, or participation of volunteer students. These demonstrations facilitate learning by allowing the student to more actively engage in the process, as we have formally documented in a separate study. They are described in detail here with the hope that other instructors and their students will also find them helpful. Three other props demonstrations for DNA replication, protein structure and linkage can be found using the url: https://sites.google.com/site/tamarif26. The effectiveness of the five props demonstrations was assessed. The results from an IRB approved study, which complements the descriptions provided here, also appear in this issue.

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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1.

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FIGURE 1.

Monomers (links in chain) linking to form polymers form macromolecules. Each link represents a monomer (monosaccharide, amino acid, and nucleotide), the joining of the links represents glycosidic linkages, peptide bonds, and phosphodiester bonds for polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids, respectively.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 79-81. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.840
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Image of FIGURE 2.

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FIGURE 2.

Demonstration for translation using students with pens. Students represent tRNA while pens represent amino acids (a.a.). a) ribosome structure with exit (E), peptidyl (P), and aminoacyl (A) sites, and placement of first tRNA with first a.a. at P site; b–d) placement of tRNA molecules, breaking of bonds between amino acids and tRNA, and formation of bonds between amino acids, in subsequent steps (see text).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2015 vol. 16 no. 1 79-81. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.840
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