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The Use of Stuffed Microbes in an Undergraduate Microbiology Course Increases Engagement and Student Learning

    Author: Ginny Webb1
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    Affiliations: 1: Division of Natural Sciences and Engineering, University of South Carolina Upstate, Spartanburg, SC 29303
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Supplemental materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: University of South Carolina Upstate, 800 University Way, Spartanburg, SC 29303. Phone: 864-503-5976. E-mail: [email protected].
    • ©2015 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2015 vol. 16 no. 2 282-285. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.924
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    Abstract:

    Student engagement, attention, and attendance during a microbiology lecture are crucial for student learning. In addition, it is challenging to cover a large number of infectious diseases during a one-semester introductory microbiology course. The use of visual aids helps students retain the information presented during a lecture. Here, I discuss the use of stuffed, plush microbes as visual aids during an introductory microbiology course. The incorporation of these stuffed microbes during a microbiology lecture results in an increase in engagement, interest, attendance, and retention of material.

References & Citations

1. Bachhel R, Thaman RG 2014 Effective use of pause procedure to enhance student engagement and learning J Clin Diagn Res 8 8 XM01 XM03 25302251 4190777
2. Freeman S, et al 2014 Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 111 23 8410 8415 10.1073/pnas.1319030111 24821756 4060654 http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1319030111
3. Golding JM 2011 The role of attendance in lecture classes: you can lead a horse to water Teach Psychol 38 40 42 10.1177/0098628310390915 http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0098628310390915
4. Miller CJ, McNear J, Metz MJ 2013 A comparison of traditional and engaging lecture methods in a large, professional-level course Adv Physiol Educ 37 4 347 355 10.1152/advan.00050.2013 24292912 http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/advan.00050.2013

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.924
2015-12-01
2019-01-21

Abstract:

Student engagement, attention, and attendance during a microbiology lecture are crucial for student learning. In addition, it is challenging to cover a large number of infectious diseases during a one-semester introductory microbiology course. The use of visual aids helps students retain the information presented during a lecture. Here, I discuss the use of stuffed, plush microbes as visual aids during an introductory microbiology course. The incorporation of these stuffed microbes during a microbiology lecture results in an increase in engagement, interest, attendance, and retention of material.

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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

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FIGURE 1

Results of a student survey on the “Catch the Bug” activity (=59).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2015 vol. 16 no. 2 282-285. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.924
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Image of FIGURE 2

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FIGURE 2

Comparisons of pre- and posttest scores and overall improvement during microbiology lecture sessions with and without the use of stuffed microbes (=25). Error bars represent standard deviation.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2015 vol. 16 no. 2 282-285. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.924
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 3

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FIGURE 3

Comparisons of pre- and posttest scores and improvement on shape- or structure-related questions during microbiology lecture sessions with and without the use of stuffed microbes (* denotes <0.05 using student t-test; =25). Error bars represent standard deviation.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2015 vol. 16 no. 2 282-285. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.924
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 4

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FIGURE 4

Results of a student survey following a microbiology lecture session. Students were presented with stuffed microbes during the lecture and a survey was administered at the end of the lecture (=25).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2015 vol. 16 no. 2 282-285. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.924
Download as Powerpoint

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