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The Use of Stuffed Microbes in an Undergraduate Microbiology Course Increases Engagement and Student Learning

    Author: Ginny Webb1
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    Affiliations: 1: Division of Natural Sciences and Engineering, University of South Carolina Upstate, Spartanburg, SC 29303
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Supplemental materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: University of South Carolina Upstate, 800 University Way, Spartanburg, SC 29303. Phone: 864-503-5976. E-mail: gwebb@uscupstate.edu.
    • ©2015 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2015 vol. 16 no. 2 282-285. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.924
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    Abstract:

    Student engagement, attention, and attendance during a microbiology lecture are crucial for student learning. In addition, it is challenging to cover a large number of infectious diseases during a one-semester introductory microbiology course. The use of visual aids helps students retain the information presented during a lecture. Here, I discuss the use of stuffed, plush microbes as visual aids during an introductory microbiology course. The incorporation of these stuffed microbes during a microbiology lecture results in an increase in engagement, interest, attendance, and retention of material.

References & Citations

1. Bachhel R, Thaman RG2014Effective use of pause procedure to enhance student engagement and learningJ Clin Diagn Res88XM01XM03253022514190777
2. Freeman S, et al2014Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematicsProc Natl Acad Sci USA111238410841510.1073/pnas.1319030111248217564060654 http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1319030111
3. Golding JM2011The role of attendance in lecture classes: you can lead a horse to waterTeach Psychol38404210.1177/0098628310390915 http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0098628310390915
4. Miller CJ, McNear J, Metz MJ2013A comparison of traditional and engaging lecture methods in a large, professional-level courseAdv Physiol Educ37434735510.1152/advan.00050.201324292912 http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/advan.00050.2013
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.924
2015-12-01
2017-04-24

Abstract:

Student engagement, attention, and attendance during a microbiology lecture are crucial for student learning. In addition, it is challenging to cover a large number of infectious diseases during a one-semester introductory microbiology course. The use of visual aids helps students retain the information presented during a lecture. Here, I discuss the use of stuffed, plush microbes as visual aids during an introductory microbiology course. The incorporation of these stuffed microbes during a microbiology lecture results in an increase in engagement, interest, attendance, and retention of material.

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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

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FIGURE 1

Results of a student survey on the “Catch the Bug” activity (=59).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2015 vol. 16 no. 2 282-285. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.924
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Image of FIGURE 2

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FIGURE 2

Comparisons of pre- and posttest scores and overall improvement during microbiology lecture sessions with and without the use of stuffed microbes (=25). Error bars represent standard deviation.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2015 vol. 16 no. 2 282-285. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.924
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 3

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FIGURE 3

Comparisons of pre- and posttest scores and improvement on shape- or structure-related questions during microbiology lecture sessions with and without the use of stuffed microbes (* denotes <0.05 using student t-test; =25). Error bars represent standard deviation.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2015 vol. 16 no. 2 282-285. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.924
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 4

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FIGURE 4

Results of a student survey following a microbiology lecture session. Students were presented with stuffed microbes during the lecture and a survey was administered at the end of the lecture (=25).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2015 vol. 16 no. 2 282-285. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.924
Download as Powerpoint

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