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Lifeguard Final Exam—Encouraging the Use of Active Learning

    Authors: Elise N. Griswold1, Daniel J. Klionsky2
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    Affiliations: 1: Ypsilanti, MI, http://elisegriswold.blogspot.com; 2: Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, klionsky@umich.edu
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • ©2015 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2015 vol. 16 no. 2 133-135. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.945
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    Abstract:

    To anyone familiar with the extensive literature on teaching and learning, there is little question that active learning is more effective than passive learning. Thus, we are not directing this letter to that particular audience. Instead, we are attempting to address the question of the best way to convince instructors who have not tried to incorporate elements of active learning into their courses to make such an attempt. There are numerous examples where it becomes immediately clear that active learning is preferable to a lecture/note-taking approach. Here, we provide a question for group discussion that can be used as one such illustration.

References & Citations

1. Griswold EN, Klionsky DJ2014Letter to the EditorJ Microbiol Biol Educ161510.1128/jmbe.v16i1.910 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.910
2. Klionsky DJ1998Application of a cooperative learning approach to introductory biologyJ Coll Sci Teach27334338
3. Klionsky DJ2002Constructing knowledge in the lecture hallJ Coll Sci Teach31246251
4. Klionsky DJ2003Why the scientific method matters: a cautionary taleTeach Prof174
5. Klionsky DJ2004Talking biology: learning outside the book—and the lectureCell Biol Ed320421110.1187/cbe.04-07-0055 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.04-07-0055
6. Mayer RE, Jackson J2005The case for coherence in scientific explanations: quantitative details can hurt qualitative understandingJ Exp Psych Appl11131810.1037/1076-898X.11.1.13 http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/1076-898X.11.1.13
7. Sirum KL, Madigan D, Klionsky DJ2009Enabling a culture of change: a life sciences faculty learning community promotes scientific teachingJ Coll Sci Teach382430
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2015-12-01
2017-11-22

Abstract:

To anyone familiar with the extensive literature on teaching and learning, there is little question that active learning is more effective than passive learning. Thus, we are not directing this letter to that particular audience. Instead, we are attempting to address the question of the best way to convince instructors who have not tried to incorporate elements of active learning into their courses to make such an attempt. There are numerous examples where it becomes immediately clear that active learning is preferable to a lecture/note-taking approach. Here, we provide a question for group discussion that can be used as one such illustration.

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FIGURE 1

Active learning is more effective than passive methods such as lecturing with note taking. Consider, for example, studying a foreign language, learning how to repair a car, getting an introduction to using a computer, or perhaps being shown how to swim—in each case, relying exclusively on a lecture would not be as effective as a more “hands-on” approach.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2015 vol. 16 no. 2 133-135. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.945
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