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Deciphering Primary and Popular Literature: An Interactive Approach for Promoting Students’ Development of Scientific, Digital, and Information Literacy in Post-Secondary Contexts

    Authors: Lacy M. Cleveland1, Jeffrey T. Olimpo2,*
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: MAST Institute, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO 80639; 2: Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Supplemental materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: B226A Biology Bldg., The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968. Phone: 915-747-6923. E-mail: jtolimpo@utep.edu.
    • ©2015 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2015 vol. 16 no. 2 256-257. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.959
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    Abstract:

    In an era of unprecedented scientific and technological advancement, it is imperative that individuals possess the ability to interpret and make meaning of current scientific phenomena, including those of both national and global importance. Despite this necessity, research suggests that less than 30% of Americans are able to understand the science section of the New York Times or other popular media resources. In this paper, we present an interactive approach utilizing primary and popular literature that is designed to: a) enhance students’ understanding of science content; b) promote students’ ability to make use of evidence to support or reject claims regarding controversial science topics; and c) improve students’ oral and written communication skills. Applications for use in post-secondary classrooms are discussed.

References & Citations

1. Alfonzo PM, Batson J2014Utilizing a co-teaching model to enhance digital literacy instruction for doctoral studentsIntern J Doc Stud96171
2. Aronson E1978The jigsaw classroomSageOxford
3. DeBoer GE2005Scientific literacy: another look at its historical and contemporary meanings and its relationship to science education reform220245 Gilbert JKScience education: major themes in educationRoutledgeNew York
4. Ferrer-Vinent IJ, Carello C2008Embedded library instruction in a first-year biology laboratory courseSci Technol Libr2832535110.1080/01942620802202352 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01942620802202352
5. Fisher D, Ivey G2005Literacy and language as learning in content-area classes: a departure from “Every teacher a teacher of reading.”Action Teach Ed2731110.1080/01626620.2005.10463378 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01626620.2005.10463378
6. Hobbs R, Jensen A2009The past, present, and future of media literacy educationJ Media Lit Educ1111
7. Miller JD2004Public understanding of, and attitudes toward, scientific research: what we know and what we need to knowPublic Understand Sci1327329410.1177/0963662504044908 http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0963662504044908
8. Strimaitis AM, Schellinger J, Jones A, Grooms J, Sampson V2014Development of an instrument to assess student knowledge necessary to critically evaluate scientific claims in the popular mediaJ Coll Sci Teach43556810.2505/4/jcst14_043_05_55 http://dx.doi.org/10.2505/4/jcst14_043_05_55
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v16i2.959
2015-12-01
2017-10-20

Abstract:

In an era of unprecedented scientific and technological advancement, it is imperative that individuals possess the ability to interpret and make meaning of current scientific phenomena, including those of both national and global importance. Despite this necessity, research suggests that less than 30% of Americans are able to understand the science section of the New York Times or other popular media resources. In this paper, we present an interactive approach utilizing primary and popular literature that is designed to: a) enhance students’ understanding of science content; b) promote students’ ability to make use of evidence to support or reject claims regarding controversial science topics; and c) improve students’ oral and written communication skills. Applications for use in post-secondary classrooms are discussed.

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