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The First Three Years of a Community Lab: Lessons Learned and Ways Forward

    Authors: Lisa Z. Scheifele1,*, Thomas Burkett2
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology, Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21210; 2: Department of Biology, Community College of Baltimore County, Catonsville, MD 21228
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 01 March 2016
    • ©2016 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Biology, Loyola University Maryland, 4501 N. Charles St, Baltimore, MD 21210. Phone: 410-617-2316. Fax: 410-617-5682. E-mail: lzscheifele@loyola.edu
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. March 2016 vol. 17 no. 1 81-85. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i1.1013
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    Abstract:

    The highly specialized nature of scientific research has erected substantial barriers between professional scientists and the laity, who have become distanced from the process of discovery. The Do-It-Yourself Biology movement seeks to remove these impediments, with community laboratories serving as vehicles for public engagement and participation in scientific inquiry. We describe our experience establishing and maintaining the BUGSS community lab in Baltimore. While each community lab is distinct in its structure, culture, and programming, we hope that this review of our experience will serve as a resource to inform those who seek to understand this growing movement and those who plan to establish their own community labs.

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v17i1.1013
2016-03-01
2017-08-18

Abstract:

The highly specialized nature of scientific research has erected substantial barriers between professional scientists and the laity, who have become distanced from the process of discovery. The Do-It-Yourself Biology movement seeks to remove these impediments, with community laboratories serving as vehicles for public engagement and participation in scientific inquiry. We describe our experience establishing and maintaining the BUGSS community lab in Baltimore. While each community lab is distinct in its structure, culture, and programming, we hope that this review of our experience will serve as a resource to inform those who seek to understand this growing movement and those who plan to establish their own community labs.

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