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Community Partnership Designed to Promote Lyme Disease Prevention and Engagement in Citizen Science

    Authors: Veronica A. Seifert1, Shane Wilson1, Samantha Toivonen1, Benjamin Clarke1, Amy Prunuske1,*
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth, MN 55812
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 01 March 2016
    • ©2016 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Supplemental materials available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: 321 Medical School Duluth, 1035 University Drive, Duluth, MN 55812. Phone: 218-726-6748. Fax: 218-726-7906. E-mail: amy.prunuske@gmail.com.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. March 2016 vol. 17 no. 1 63-69. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i1.1014
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    Abstract:

    The goal of this project is to promote Lyme disease prevention and to cultivate an interest in science through a citizen-science project coordinated by researchers at a public university and teachers at rural high schools. The lesson plan is designed to increase student interest in pursuing a science career through participation in an authentic research experience, utilizing a topic that has implications on the health of the surrounding community. Students are introduced in the classroom to zoonotic diseases transmitted by the tick, the health risks of Lyme disease, and disease prevention strategies. Students then participate in a research experience collecting field data and ticks from their community, which are used in university research. To measure changes in student knowledge and attitudes toward Lyme disease and science careers, students completed surveys related to the learning objectives associated with the experience. We found participation in the activity increased student confidence and ability to correctly differentiate a deer tick from a wood tick and to recognize the symptoms of Lyme disease. In addition, students reported increased interest in pursuing a science degree in college or graduate school. Authentic research experience related to a disease relevant to the local community is effective at enhancing high school student engagement in science.

Key Concept Ranking

Ixodes scapularis
0.9583334
Borrelia burgdorferi
0.9463946
Infectious Diseases
0.85456795
Chemicals
0.6206597
Zoonotic Diseases
0.55351365
Confocal Microscopy
0.5166127
0.9583334

References & Citations

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2. Bandura A1977Social learning theoryGeneral Learning PressNew York, NY
3. Bransford J, Brown AL, Cocking RR1999How people learn: brain, mind, experience, and schoolThe National Academies PressWashington, DC
4. Brown JS, Collins A, Duguid S1989Situated cognition and the culture of learningEduc Res181324210.3102/0013189X018001032 http://dx.doi.org/10.3102/0013189X018001032
5. Bruner J1996The culture of educationHarvard University PressCambridge, MA
6. Centers for Disease control and PreventionReported cases of lyme disease[Online.] www.cdc.gov/lyme/stats/index.html
7. Dickinson JL, et al2012The current state of citizen science as a tool for ecological research and public engagementFrontiers Ecol Environ1029129710.1890/110236 http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/110236
8. Falco RC, Fish D1992A comparison of methods for sampling the deer tick, Ixodes dammini, in a Lyme disease endemic areaExp Appl Acarol14216517310.1007/BF012191081638929 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01219108
9. Fitzakerley JL, Michlin ML, Paton J, Dubinsky JM2013Neuroscientists’ classroom visits positively impact student attitudesPLOS One812e8403510.1371/journal.pone.0084035 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0084035
10. Gogolin L, Swartz F1992A quantitative and qualitative inquiry into the attitudes toward science of nonscience college studentsJ Res Sci Teach29548750410.1002/tea.3660290505 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/tea.3660290505
11. Kelly D, Xie H, Nord CW, Jenkins F, Chan JY, Kastberg D2013Performance of US 15-year-old students in mathematics, science, and reading literacy in an international context—first look at PISA 2012National Center for Education Statistics[Online.] http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2014024
12. Komoroske LM, Hameed SO, Szoboszlai AI, Newsom AJ, Williams SL2015A scientist’s guide to achieving broader impacts through K–12 STEM collaborationBioScience65331332210.1093/biosci/biu222 http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biu222
13. Laursen S, Liston C, Thiry H, Graf J2007What good is a scientist in the classroom? Participant outcomes and program design features for a short-duration science outreach intervention in K–12 classroomsCBE Life Sci Educ6496410.1187/cbe.06-05-0165173393941810206 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.06-05-0165
14. Miller NJ, Rainone EE, Dyer MC, Gonzalez ML, Mather TN2011Tick bite protection with permethrin-treated summer-weight clothingJ Med Entomol48232733310.1603/ME1015821485369 http://dx.doi.org/10.1603/ME10158
15. National Academies of Sciences2012Monitoring progress toward successful K–12 STEM education: a nation advancing?The National Academies PressWashington, DC
16. National Research Council2012A framework for K–12 science education: practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas[Online.] www.nap.edu/catalog/13165/a-framework-for-k-12-science-education-practices-crosscutting-concepts
17. National Science Board2014Revisiting the STEM workforce, a companion to science and engineering indicatorsNational Science Foundation[Online.] www.nsf.gov/nsb/publications/2015/nsb201510.pdf
18. PCAST2010Prepare and inspire: K–12 education in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) for America’s futurePresident’s Council of Advisors on Science and TechnologyWashington, DC[Online.] www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/pcast-stem-ed-final.pdf
19. Scott HC2013Inquiry, efficacy, and science educationPhD dissertationGeorgia Southern UniversityStatesboro, GA
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v17i1.1014
2016-03-01
2017-04-24

Abstract:

The goal of this project is to promote Lyme disease prevention and to cultivate an interest in science through a citizen-science project coordinated by researchers at a public university and teachers at rural high schools. The lesson plan is designed to increase student interest in pursuing a science career through participation in an authentic research experience, utilizing a topic that has implications on the health of the surrounding community. Students are introduced in the classroom to zoonotic diseases transmitted by the tick, the health risks of Lyme disease, and disease prevention strategies. Students then participate in a research experience collecting field data and ticks from their community, which are used in university research. To measure changes in student knowledge and attitudes toward Lyme disease and science careers, students completed surveys related to the learning objectives associated with the experience. We found participation in the activity increased student confidence and ability to correctly differentiate a deer tick from a wood tick and to recognize the symptoms of Lyme disease. In addition, students reported increased interest in pursuing a science degree in college or graduate school. Authentic research experience related to a disease relevant to the local community is effective at enhancing high school student engagement in science.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Examples of students conducting the fieldwork in woods near their high school. Drag cloth on the ground (A) and in use (B).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. March 2016 vol. 17 no. 1 63-69. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i1.1014
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Image of FIGURE 2

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FIGURE 2

Student-reported ability to achieve the learning objectives before and after participation in the activity. Students were asked to rate their agreement with several statements (1 = strongly disagree, 2 = disagree, 3 = neutral, 4 = agree, 5 = strongly agree). The students’ answers were averaged. *Indicates a statistically significant difference with a value < 0.05.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. March 2016 vol. 17 no. 1 63-69. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i1.1014
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Image of FIGURE 3

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FIGURE 3

Science attitudes were collected from students participating in the Lesson on Lyme using the Modified Attitudes Toward Science Inventory. Students from three different high schools ( = 219) used a Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 2 = disagree, 3 = neutral, 4 = agree, 5 = strongly agree) to indicate their agreement or disagreement with each of the statements. The graph shows the percentage of students selecting each of the categories.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. March 2016 vol. 17 no. 1 63-69. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i1.1014
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 4

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FIGURE 4

Model of constituents benefitting from lyme outreach partnership.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. March 2016 vol. 17 no. 1 63-69. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i1.1014
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