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The Engaged Microbiologist: Bringing the Microbiological Sciences to the K–12 Community

    Author: David J. Westenberg1
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biological Sciences and Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 01 March 2016
    • ©2016 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: 400 W. 11th Street, Rolla, MO 65409. Phone: 573-341-4798. Fax: 573-341-4821. E-mail: djwesten@mst.edu.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. March 2016 vol. 17 no. 1 29-31. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i1.1043
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    Abstract:

    Exposing K–12 students to cutting edge science that impacts their daily lives can bring classroom lessons to life. Citizen-science projects are an excellent way to bring high-level science to the classroom and help satisfy one of the cornerstone concepts of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), “engaging in practices that scientists and engineers actually use.” This can be a daunting task for teachers who may lack the background or resources to integrate these projects into the classroom. This is where scientific societies such as the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) can play a critical role. ASM encourages its members to engage with the K–12 community by providing networking opportunities and resources for ASM members and K–12 teachers to work together to bring microbiology into the classroom. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education

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References & Citations

1. American Association for the Advancement of Science2011Vision and change in undergraduate biology education: a call to actionWashington, DC[Online.] http://visionandchange.org
2. Chang A2011A retrospective look at 20 years of ASM education programs (1990–2010) and a prospective look at the next 20 years (2011–2030)J Microbiol Biol Educ1281210.1128/jmbe.v12i1.253 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v12i1.253
3. Freeman S, et al2014Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematicsProc Natl Acad Sci USA1118410841510.1073/pnas.1319030111248217564060654 http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1319030111
4. Merkel S2013The development of curricular guidelines for introductory microbiology that focus on understandingJ Microbiol Biol Educ13323810.1128/jmbe.v13i1.3633577306 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v13i1.363
5. National Research Council2012A framework for K–12 science education: practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideasThe National Academies PressWashington, DC
6. NGSS Lead States2013Next generation science standards: for states, by statesThe National Academies PressWashington, DC
7. STEM Education Coalition20142014 annual reportSTEM Education CoalitionWashington, DC
8. US Chamber of Commerce FoundationndSTEM education talking points[Online.] www.uschamberfoundation.org/content/stem-education-talking-points
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v17i1.1043
2016-03-01
2017-09-24

Abstract:

Exposing K–12 students to cutting edge science that impacts their daily lives can bring classroom lessons to life. Citizen-science projects are an excellent way to bring high-level science to the classroom and help satisfy one of the cornerstone concepts of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), “engaging in practices that scientists and engineers actually use.” This can be a daunting task for teachers who may lack the background or resources to integrate these projects into the classroom. This is where scientific societies such as the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) can play a critical role. ASM encourages its members to engage with the K–12 community by providing networking opportunities and resources for ASM members and K–12 teachers to work together to bring microbiology into the classroom. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education

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