1887

ImmuneQuest: Assessment of a Video Game as a Supplement to an Undergraduate Immunology Course

    Author: Stacey L. Raimondi1
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Elmhurst College, Elmhurst, IL 60126
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 04 May 2016
    • ©2016 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: Elmhurst College, 190 Prospect Ave., Box 133, Elmhurst, IL 60126. Phone: 630-617-3323. Fax: 630-617-6474. E-mail: raimondis@elmhurst.edu.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2016 vol. 17 no. 2 237-245. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1060
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
  • PDF
    378.30 Kb
  • XML
  • HTML
    47.61 Kb

    Abstract:

    The study of immunology, particularly in this day and age, is an integral aspect of the training of future biologists, especially health professionals. Unfortunately, many students lose interest in or lack true comprehension of immunology due to the jargon of the field, preventing them from gaining a true conceptual understanding that is essential to all biological learning. To that end, a new video game, ImmuneQuest, has been developed that allows undergraduate students to “be” cells in the immune system, finding and attacking pathogens, while answering questions to earn additional abilities. The ultimate goal of ImmuneQuest is to allow students to understand how the major cells in the immune system work together to fight disease, rather than focusing on them as separate entities as is more commonly done in lecture material. This work provides the first assessment of ImmuneQuest in an upper-level immunology course. Students had significant gains in learning of information presented in ImmuneQuest compared with information discussed in lecture only. Furthermore, while students found the game “frustrating” at times, they agreed that the game aided their learning and recommended it for future courses. Taken together, these results suggest that ImmuneQuest appears to be a useful tool to supplement lecture material and increase student learning and comprehension.

Key Concept Ranking

Adaptive Immune System
1.0726382
Innate Immune System
1.0121744
Immune Systems
0.85471016
Immune Cells
0.7294945
T Helper Cells
0.5625
Tumor Necrosis Factor
0.5362097
1.0726382

References & Citations

1. Bealer J, Bealer V1996Acting out immunity: a simulation of a complicated conceptAm Biol Teach58636036210.2307/4450177 http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/4450177
2. Curtis ASG1992Cellular immunology: lymphoid organs and the structure and distribution of their cells Ledbetter MLSExercises in cell biology for the undergraduate laboratoryAmerican Society for Cell Biology Education Committee[Online] www.ascb.org/exercises-in-cell-biology-for-the-undergraduate-laboratory/
3. Curtis ASG1992Cellular immunology: use of surface markers to discriminate T and B lymphocytes Ledbetter MLSExercises in cell biology for the undergraduate laboratoryAmerican Society for Cell Biology Education Committee[Online] www.ascb.org/exercises-in-cell-biology-for-the-undergraduate-laboratory/
4. Curtis ASG1992Cellular immunology: mitogenic stimulation of lymphocytes Ledbetter MLSExercises in cell biology for the undergraduate laboratoryAmerican Society for Cell Biology Education Committee[Online] www.ascb.org/exercises-in-cell-biology-for-the-undergraduate-laboratory/
5. Freeman S, et al2014Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematicsPNAS111238410841510.1073/pnas.1319030111248217564060654 http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1319030111
6. Goodall CA1992Cellular immunology: enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) Ledbetter MLSExercises in cell biology for the undergraduate laboratory[Online]American Society for Cell Biology Education Committee
7. Goyette SR, DeLuca J2007A semester-long student-directed research project involving enzyme immunoassay: appropriate for immunology, endocrinology, or neuroscience coursesCBE Life Sci Educ633234210.1187/cbe.07-01-0001 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.07-01-0001
8. Lloyd CAC13 March 2015, posting date. A winning method to teach immunologyLearners Together[Online.] http://www.learnerstogether.net/home/2015/3/13/a-winning-method-to-teach-immunology.html
9. Mazur E2009Farewell, lecture?Science3235910505110.1126/science.116892719119207 http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1168927
10. Robinson DL, Lau JM2012Assessment of an ELISA laboratory exerciseAm Biol Teach74855856310.1525/abt.2012.74.8.5 http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/abt.2012.74.8.5
11. Staneloudi C, Chlichlia K2011Pedagogical and didactical innovations in higher education: teaching methodologies in immunology laboratory practicals for undergraduate students65486555INTED2011 ProceedingsValencia, Spain
jmbe.v17i2.1060.citations
jmbe/17/2
content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1060
Loading

Citations loading...

Supplemental Material

No supplementary material available for this content.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1060
2016-05-04
2017-05-29

Abstract:

The study of immunology, particularly in this day and age, is an integral aspect of the training of future biologists, especially health professionals. Unfortunately, many students lose interest in or lack true comprehension of immunology due to the jargon of the field, preventing them from gaining a true conceptual understanding that is essential to all biological learning. To that end, a new video game, ImmuneQuest, has been developed that allows undergraduate students to “be” cells in the immune system, finding and attacking pathogens, while answering questions to earn additional abilities. The ultimate goal of ImmuneQuest is to allow students to understand how the major cells in the immune system work together to fight disease, rather than focusing on them as separate entities as is more commonly done in lecture material. This work provides the first assessment of ImmuneQuest in an upper-level immunology course. Students had significant gains in learning of information presented in ImmuneQuest compared with information discussed in lecture only. Furthermore, while students found the game “frustrating” at times, they agreed that the game aided their learning and recommended it for future courses. Taken together, these results suggest that ImmuneQuest appears to be a useful tool to supplement lecture material and increase student learning and comprehension.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmbe/17/2/jmbe-17-237.xml.a.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1060&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

Click to view

FIGURE 1

Student learning improves with ImmuneQuest. A) Pre- and post-assessment scores of all students in the course. * denotes statistical significance < 0.001, Student’s -test. B) Pre-and post-assessment scores were sub-divided into material covered in lecture only, both lecture and ImmuneQuest, or ImmuneQuest only. Significant improvements were seen in all cases between pre and post scores. Students scored significantly higher on post-assessment information covered in ImmuneQuest only compared with lecture alone. * denotes statistical significance < 0.05 compared to lecture only post-assessment scores, ANOVA on Ranks with a Tukey Test.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2016 vol. 17 no. 2 237-245. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1060
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 2

Click to view

FIGURE 2

Students of all abilities succeed and fail while playing ImmuneQuest. A) The number of stars (out of 5) students earned on each of the three levels. 0 stars indicates the student was unable to complete the level. B) Average overall score in the course (out of 100%) for students who received 5 stars or 1 star on each level of ImmuneQuest. C–D) Average (C) pre- and (D) post-assessment scores (out of 11) for students who received 5 stars or 1 star on each level of ImmuneQuest. No significant difference in scores was observed in B–D.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2016 vol. 17 no. 2 237-245. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1060
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 3

Click to view

FIGURE 3

Students playing ImmuneQuest could be grouped into “types” and had varying opinions on the game. A) Students were divided into four “types” – Average, Perfectionist, Minimalist, or Struggler – and hours spent playing the game as well as number of wins, losses, and aborted attempts were analyzed. B) Average overall course grade (out of 100%) for each “type” of student. No significant difference was observed between each “type.” C) A Wordle was created to illustrate student responses to a question asking them to use one word to describe ImmuneQuest. “Frustrating” was used by 7/20 students while all other words were written once.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2016 vol. 17 no. 2 237-245. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1060
Download as Powerpoint

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error