1887

Use of Computer Models and Animations to Teach about B Cell (antibody) and T Cell Recombination (TCR)

    Authors: Fran Norflus1,*, Neil Charles Allen2
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology, Clayton State University, Morrow, GA 30260; 2: Department of Computer Science and Information Technology, Clayton State University, Morrow, GA 30260
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 04 May 2016
    • ©2016 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Supplemental materials available at http://asmscience.org/jmbe
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Clayton State University, Department of Biology, Morrow, Georgia 30260. Phone: 678-466-4852. Fax: 678-466-4797. E-mail: fnorflus@clayton.edu.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2016 vol. 17 no. 2 292-293. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1079
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    Abstract:

    This manuscript presents a technique on how to use both computer models and animations to teach about the process of recombination. This is a traditionally difficult topic taught in both microbiology and immunology classes. Active learning techniques are presented to help teach the students about this process. In more introductory classes, the instructor can teach the students about how antibody molecules are made. In more advanced classes, this topic can be expanded and the students can also learn how T cell receptors are made. Initially, the students are shown an animation of antibody recombination where they can select to see the different segments coming together which are randomly generated. Then, they look at their computers to see the different segments of antibodies shown in different colors and they can select one fragment from the different sections. We feel that the use of these different techniques is important in reinforcing the topic.

Key Concept Ranking

Light Chain
0.8167503
T Cell Receptor
0.73515433
Heavy Chain
0.667891
0.8167503

References & Citations

1. Gunn K, McCauslin CS, Staiger J, Pirone DM2013Inquiry-based learning: inflammation as a model to teach molecular techniques for assessing gene expressionJ Microbiol Biol Educ14218919610.1128/jmbe.v14i2.542243583823867756 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v14i2.542
2. Jensen JL, Kummer TA, Godoy PDdM2015Improvements from a flipped classroom may simply be the fruits of active learningCBE Life Sci Educ14112
3. Tsaushu M, Tal T, Sagy O, Kali Y, Gepstein S, Zilberstein D2012Peer learning and support of technology in an undergraduate biology classCBE Life Sci Educ1140241210.1187/cbe.12-04-0042232228363516796 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.12-04-0042
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1079
2016-05-04
2017-06-24

Abstract:

This manuscript presents a technique on how to use both computer models and animations to teach about the process of recombination. This is a traditionally difficult topic taught in both microbiology and immunology classes. Active learning techniques are presented to help teach the students about this process. In more introductory classes, the instructor can teach the students about how antibody molecules are made. In more advanced classes, this topic can be expanded and the students can also learn how T cell receptors are made. Initially, the students are shown an animation of antibody recombination where they can select to see the different segments coming together which are randomly generated. Then, they look at their computers to see the different segments of antibodies shown in different colors and they can select one fragment from the different sections. We feel that the use of these different techniques is important in reinforcing the topic.

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