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Sexual Health—Get Involved: A Kinesthetic Learning Experience of STI Transmission and Prevention

    Authors: Selina Patel1, Anne Marie Krachler1,*
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    Affiliations: 1: Institute of Microbiology and Infection, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 04 May 2016
    • ©2016 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Supplemental materials available at http://asmscience.org/jmbe
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Institute of Microbiology and Infection, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK. Phone: +44(0)121 414 7417. E-mail: a.krachler@bham.ac.uk.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2016 vol. 17 no. 2 302-304. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1091
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    Abstract:

    OFSTED repeatedly finds the teaching of sexually transmitted infections in secondary schools ‘inadequate’ across the UK (3). This is thought to be due to a number of reasons, including the fact that staff teaching this topic feel inadequately prepared and not knowledgeable enough to do so (4).In 2010, over half of newly diagnosed sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in England were within patients aged 16-24 years (2). This could be the result of a lack of mandatory, quality sexual health education in schools, combined with larger scale social issues. Young females, in particular, reported feelings of shame when visiting sexual health clinics which on occasion may compel them to lie about their sexual history to a practitioner in order to protect a ‘fragile sexual reputation’(1).In response to the recommendations of FPA and the aforementioned public health statistics, this session was developed to improve student understanding of sexual health and of the risks associated with different sexual behaviors. Another aim was, by integrating information about the importance of regular sexual health check-ups into sexual health education in schools, to reduce the associated feelings of shame across the young female population. The activity was carried out with two classes of Year 12 students (16-17 years) in an independent school in the London borough of Lewisham. The session builds on education about STIs, which is part of the national science curriculum, and extends concepts about transmission to the most common STIs prevalent within the population aged 16-24.

Key Concept Ranking

Chlamydia Infection
0.5963276
Secondary Infection
0.55579793
Gonorrhea
0.53125
Chlamydia
0.5
Infection
0.4325521
0.5963276

References & Citations

1. Fallon D2012They’re gonna think it now: narratives of shame in the sexual health experiences of young peopleSociology4731833210.1177/0038038512441281 http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0038038512441281
2. National Health Service2014Open your eyes to STIs[Online.] www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Sexandyoungpeople/Pages/STIs.aspxNHS Live WellAccessed October
3. OFSTED2013Personal, social, health and economic education needs improvement (Press release)[Online.] www.gov.uk/government/news/personal-social-health-and-economic-education-needs-improvementAccessed January 2016
4. Westwood JL, Mullan B2007Knowledge and attitudes of young people, teachers and school nurses regarding sexual health education in EnglandSexual Educ Sexuality Society Learn7143159
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1091
2016-05-04
2017-08-20

Abstract:

OFSTED repeatedly finds the teaching of sexually transmitted infections in secondary schools ‘inadequate’ across the UK (3). This is thought to be due to a number of reasons, including the fact that staff teaching this topic feel inadequately prepared and not knowledgeable enough to do so (4).In 2010, over half of newly diagnosed sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in England were within patients aged 16-24 years (2). This could be the result of a lack of mandatory, quality sexual health education in schools, combined with larger scale social issues. Young females, in particular, reported feelings of shame when visiting sexual health clinics which on occasion may compel them to lie about their sexual history to a practitioner in order to protect a ‘fragile sexual reputation’(1).In response to the recommendations of FPA and the aforementioned public health statistics, this session was developed to improve student understanding of sexual health and of the risks associated with different sexual behaviors. Another aim was, by integrating information about the importance of regular sexual health check-ups into sexual health education in schools, to reduce the associated feelings of shame across the young female population. The activity was carried out with two classes of Year 12 students (16-17 years) in an independent school in the London borough of Lewisham. The session builds on education about STIs, which is part of the national science curriculum, and extends concepts about transmission to the most common STIs prevalent within the population aged 16-24.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

A) Colored cards are labeled to illustrate what they represent, attached to a lanyard and worn around the neck by all participants. Colored labeled cards were used to indicate a participant is “not infected” with an STI (B), has visited the clinic area, was “tested,” and was found to be clear of an STI (C), is infected with “chlamydia” (D), has visited the clinic area, was tested, and was then “cured of an STI” (E), or is infected with “gonorrhea” (F).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2016 vol. 17 no. 2 302-304. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1091
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Image of FIGURE 2

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FIGURE 2

A ‘CLINIC’ sign was attached at the front of the classroom to indicate the sexual health clinical area.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2016 vol. 17 no. 2 302-304. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1091
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Image of FIGURE 3

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FIGURE 3

Participants move around the room, wearing the lanyards (A). After each “round,” they pass any extra cards attached to their lanyards to an adjacent person, reflecting a “sexual encounter.” Depending on the room layout, movement can either be in a circle (e.g., around a desk) (B) or across the room (C) to better reflect random encounters.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2016 vol. 17 no. 2 302-304. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1091
Download as Powerpoint

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