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From the Editor-in-Chief: Questions of Gender Equity in the Undergraduate Biology Classroom

    Author: Samantha L. Elliott1
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Associate Professor, Biology, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, St. Mary’s City, MD 20686
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 04 May 2016
    • ©2016 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: 47645 College Dr., St Mary’s City, MD 20686. Phone: 240-895-4376. E-mail: slelliott@smcm.edu.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2016 vol. 17 no. 2 186-188. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1136
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    Abstract:

    This editorial describes recent research about the perception of peer achievement in the undergraduate biology classroom. The research, along with statistical data about female retention, provides insight into gender disparities and provides opportunities to address gender bias in the classroom.

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References & Citations

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2. Cameron EZ, White AM, Gray ME2016Solving the productivity and impact puzzle: do men outperform women, or are metrics biased?BioScience10.1093/biosci/biv173 http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biv173
3. Chen JM, Moons WG2014They won’t listen to me: anticipated power and women’s disinterest in male-dominated domainsGroup Proc Intergroup Rel18111612810.1177/1368430214550340 http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1368430214550340
4. Cunningham BC, Hoyer KM, Sparks D2015Stats in brief: gender differences in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) interest, credits earned, and NAEP performance in the 12th GradeNational Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, US Department of EducationWashington, DC
5. Eddy S, Brownell S, Wenderoth MP2014Gender gaps in achievement and participation in multiple introductory biology classroomsCBE Life Sci Educ133478492251852314152209
6. Gino F, Wilmuth CA, Brooks AW2015Compared to men, women may view professional advancement as equally attainable, but less desirablePNAS11240123541235910.1073/pnas.1502567112263925334603465 http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1502567112
7. Grunspan DZ, Eddy SL, Brownell SE, Wiggins BL, Crowe AJ, Goodreau SM2016Males under-estimate academic performance of their female peers in undergraduate biology classroomsPLOS One10.1371/journal.pone.0148405268633204749286 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0148405
8. Handley IM, Brown ER, Moss-Racusin CA, Smith JL2015Quality of evidence revealing subtle gender bias in science is in the eye of the beholderPNAS11243132011320610.1073/pnas.1510649112264600014629390 http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1510649112
9. Moss-Racusin CA, Dovidio JF, Brescoli VL, Graham MJ, Handelsman J2012Science faculty’s subtle gender biases favor male studentsPNAS10941164741647910.1073/pnas.1211286109229881263478626 http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1211286109
10. National Science Foundation, National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics2015Doctorate recipients from U.S. universities: 2014Special Report NSF 16-300Arlington, VAAvailable at www.nsf.gov/statistics/2016/nsf16300/
11. National Science Foundation, National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics2015Women, minorities, and persons with disabilities in science and engineering: 2015Special Report NSF 15-311Arlington, VAAvailable at www.nsf.gov/statistics/wmpd/
12. Rudman LA, Ashmore RD, Gary ML2001“Unlearning” automatic biases: the malleability of implicit prejudice and stereotypesJ Personality Soc Psychol81585686810.1037/0022-3514.81.5.856 http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.81.5.856
13. Seymour E, Hewitt NM2000Talking about leaving: why undergraduates leave the sciencesWestview PressBoulder, CO
14. Shaw EJ, Barbuti S2010Patterns of persistence in intended college major with a focus on STEM majorNACADA J302193410.12930/0271-9517-30.2.19 http://dx.doi.org/10.12930/0271-9517-30.2.19
15. Singer SR, Nielsen NR, Schweingruber HA2012Discipline-based education research: understanding and improving learning in undergraduate science and engineeringThe National Academies PressWashington, DC
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17. Smith JL, Handley IM, Zale AV, Rushing S, Potvin MA2015Now hiring! Empirically testing a three-step intervention to increase faculty gender diversity in STEMBioScience65111084108710.1093/biosci/biv138 http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biv138
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1136
2016-05-04
2017-07-20

Abstract:

This editorial describes recent research about the perception of peer achievement in the undergraduate biology classroom. The research, along with statistical data about female retention, provides insight into gender disparities and provides opportunities to address gender bias in the classroom.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Percentages of men and women who earned biological and biomedical science degrees in the United States from 2010 to 2012. Data gathered from ( 18 ).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2016 vol. 17 no. 2 186-188. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1136
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FIGURE 2

Percentage of students by gender earning Bachelor’s (A), Master’s (B), and Doctoral (C) degrees in biological and biomedical sciences in the United States over time. Data gathered from ( 18 ).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2016 vol. 17 no. 2 186-188. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1136
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Image of FIGURE 3

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FIGURE 3

Percentages of men and women employed in biological and biomedical sciences by degree level in the United States in 2010. Data gathered from ( 11 ).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2016 vol. 17 no. 2 186-188. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.1136
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