1887

Evolution across the Curriculum: Microbiology

    Authors: Alita R. Burmeister1,2,3,*, James J. Smith2,3,4,5,6
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824; 2: Program in Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Behavior, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824; 3: BEACON Center for the Study of Evolution in Action, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824; 4: Lyman Briggs College, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48825; 5: Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824; 6: Department of Integrative Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 04 May 2016
    • ©2016 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: 567 Wilson Road, 6176, East Lansing, MI 48824. Phone: 517-884-5396. E-mail: alita@msu.edu.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2016 vol. 17 no. 2 252-260. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.988
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    Abstract:

    An integrated understanding of microbiology and evolutionary biology is essential for students pursuing careers in microbiology and healthcare fields. In this Perspective, we discuss the usefulness of evolutionary concepts and an overall evolutionary framework for students enrolled in microbiology courses. Further, we propose a set of learning goals for students studying microbial evolution concepts. We then describe some barriers to microbial evolution teaching and learning and encourage the continued incorporation of evidence-based teaching practices into microbiology courses at all levels. Next, we review the current status of microbial evolution assessment tools and describe some education resources available for teaching microbial evolution. Successful microbial evolution education will require that evolution be taught across the undergraduate biology curriculum, with a continued focus on applications and applied careers, while aligning with national biology education reform initiatives. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education

Key Concept Ranking

Microbial Evolution
0.554402
Genetic Drift
0.46303174
Genetic Variation
0.44535878
Horizontal Gene Transfer
0.43394586
0.554402

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v17i2.988
2016-05-04
2017-09-24

Abstract:

An integrated understanding of microbiology and evolutionary biology is essential for students pursuing careers in microbiology and healthcare fields. In this Perspective, we discuss the usefulness of evolutionary concepts and an overall evolutionary framework for students enrolled in microbiology courses. Further, we propose a set of learning goals for students studying microbial evolution concepts. We then describe some barriers to microbial evolution teaching and learning and encourage the continued incorporation of evidence-based teaching practices into microbiology courses at all levels. Next, we review the current status of microbial evolution assessment tools and describe some education resources available for teaching microbial evolution. Successful microbial evolution education will require that evolution be taught across the undergraduate biology curriculum, with a continued focus on applications and applied careers, while aligning with national biology education reform initiatives. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education

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