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Video Lecture Capture Technology Helps Students Study without Affecting Attendance in Large Microbiology Lecture Courses

    Authors: Jennifer L. McLean1,*, Erica L. Suchman1
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2016 vol. 17 no. 3 480-481. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i3.1123
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    Abstract:

    Recording lectures using video lecture capture software and making them available for students to watch anytime, from anywhere, has become a common practice in many universities across many disciplines. The software has become increasingly easy to use and is commonly provided and maintained by higher education institutions. Several studies have reported that students use lecture capture to enhance their learning and study for assessments, as well as to catch up on material they miss when they cannot attend class due to extenuating circumstances. Furthermore, students with disabilities and students from non-English Speaking Backgrounds (NESB) may benefit from being able to watch the video lecture captures at their own pace. Yet, the effect of this technology on class attendance remains a controversial topic and largely unexplored in undergraduate microbiology education. Here, we show that when video lecture captures were available in our large enrollment general microbiology courses, attendance did not decrease. In fact, the majority of students reported that having the videos available did not encourage them to skip class, but rather they used them as a study tool. When we surveyed NESB students and nontraditional students about their attitudes toward this technology, they found it helpful for their learning and for keeping up with the material.

References & Citations

1. Cooner TS2010Creating opportunities for students in large cohorts to reflect in and on practice: lessons learnt from a formative evaluation of students’ experience of a technology-enhanced blended learning designBrit J Educ Technol41227128610.1111/j.1467-8535.2009.00933.x http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8535.2009.00933.x
2. Fei J, Mather C, Elmer S, Allan C, Chin C, Chandler L2013Use of Echo360 generated materials and its impact on class attendance28829230th Ascilite ConferenceMacquarie UniversitySydney, Australia
3. Leadbeater W, Shuttleworth T, Couperthwaite J, Nightingale K2013Evaluating the use and impact of lecture recording in undergraduates: evidence for distinct approaches by different groups of studentsComput Educ6118519210.1016/j.compedu.2012.09.011 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2012.09.011
4. Owston R, Lupshenyuk D, Wideman H2011Lecture capture in large undergraduate classes: student perceptions and academic performanceJ Internet Higher Educ13426226810.1016/j.iheduc.2011.05.006 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iheduc.2011.05.006
5. Suchman E, Uchiyama K, Smith R, Bender K2006Evaluating the impact of a classroom response system in a microbiology courseMicrobiol Educ731110.1128/154288106X14285807012764236535623633139 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/154288106X14285807012764
6. Traphagan T, Kuesera J, Kishi K2010Impact of class lecture webcasting on attendance and learningEduc Technol Res Devt58193710.1007/s11423-009-9128-7 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11423-009-9128-7
7. Vajoczki S, Watt S, Marquis N, Liao R, Vine M2011Students approach to learning and their use of lecture captureJ Educ Multimedia Hypermedia202195214
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v17i3.1123
2016-12-02
2017-11-21

Abstract:

Recording lectures using video lecture capture software and making them available for students to watch anytime, from anywhere, has become a common practice in many universities across many disciplines. The software has become increasingly easy to use and is commonly provided and maintained by higher education institutions. Several studies have reported that students use lecture capture to enhance their learning and study for assessments, as well as to catch up on material they miss when they cannot attend class due to extenuating circumstances. Furthermore, students with disabilities and students from non-English Speaking Backgrounds (NESB) may benefit from being able to watch the video lecture captures at their own pace. Yet, the effect of this technology on class attendance remains a controversial topic and largely unexplored in undergraduate microbiology education. Here, we show that when video lecture captures were available in our large enrollment general microbiology courses, attendance did not decrease. In fact, the majority of students reported that having the videos available did not encourage them to skip class, but rather they used them as a study tool. When we surveyed NESB students and nontraditional students about their attitudes toward this technology, they found it helpful for their learning and for keeping up with the material.

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FIGURE 1

Comparison of daily class attendance during semesters when video lecture capture was available and was not available to the students. The mean percentage of daily attendance was calculated across four semesters of a general microbiology course before lecture capture videos were available to the students (83 ± SD) and across six semesters after video lecture capture became available (81 ± SD). Course enrollment ranged from 64 to 139 students (mean = 101 students); 1,014 total students. SD = standard deviation.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2016 vol. 17 no. 3 480-481. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i3.1123
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