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Development of Oral Communication Skills by Undergraduates that Convey Evolutionary Concepts to the Public

    Authors: Lacy M. Cleveland1,*, Robert J. Reinsvold2
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    Affiliations: 1: MAST Institute, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO 80639; 2: School of Biological Sciences, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO 80639
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1227
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    Abstract:

    Leaders in undergraduate biology education have recommended that post-secondary programs recognize the importance of communication. Scientists are generally recognized as the conduit for communicating scientific information with the public. Traditionally, scientific training has focused on building students’ content knowledge, knowledge of terminology, and ability to communicate with other scientists. The majority of undergraduate biology programs do not include a focus on building their students’ ability to communicate scientific information to non-scientists. Due to both its controversy (outside the scientific community) and conflicting scientific and lay terminology, speaking to non-scientists about evolution can be especially challenging. In this Tips and Tool article, we present an interactive approach to help build students’ conceptual knowledge of evolution and to develop their ability to orally communicate with non-scientists.

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References & Citations

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6. Weitkamp E2014Exploring serendipitous dialogueJ Sci Commun1304http://eprints.uwe.ac.uk/24755/1/JCOM_1304_2014_E.pdf
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10. Miller JD2004Public understanding of, and attitudes toward scientific research: what we know and what we need to knowPublic Understand Sci1327329410.1177/0963662504044908 http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0963662504044908
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12. Yoho RA, Vanmali BH2016Controversy in biology classrooms—citizen science approaches to evolution and applications to climate change discussionsJ Microbiol Biol Educ17111011410.1128/jmbe.v17i1.1026270476044798790 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v17i1.1026
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1227
2017-04-21
2017-06-27

Abstract:

Leaders in undergraduate biology education have recommended that post-secondary programs recognize the importance of communication. Scientists are generally recognized as the conduit for communicating scientific information with the public. Traditionally, scientific training has focused on building students’ content knowledge, knowledge of terminology, and ability to communicate with other scientists. The majority of undergraduate biology programs do not include a focus on building their students’ ability to communicate scientific information to non-scientists. Due to both its controversy (outside the scientific community) and conflicting scientific and lay terminology, speaking to non-scientists about evolution can be especially challenging. In this Tips and Tool article, we present an interactive approach to help build students’ conceptual knowledge of evolution and to develop their ability to orally communicate with non-scientists.

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