1887

A Model Approach to Public Engagement Training for Students in Developing Countries

    Authors: Thomas K. Karikari1,2,*, Nat Ato Yawson3
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK; 2: Midlands Integrative Biosciences Training Partnership, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK; 3: Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, College of Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 15 September 2016 Accepted 09 November 2016 Published 21 April 2017
    • ©2017 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Supplemental materials available at http://asmscience.org/jmbe
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK. Phone: +44 (0)2476 522559. Fax: +44 (0)2476 523701. E-mail: ohenekakari@gmail.com.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1244
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
  • XML
    31.86 Kb
  • PDF
    342.02 Kb
  • HTML
    33.17 Kb

    Abstract:

    Early involvement in public engagement activities may enhance undergraduate and graduate students’ long-term interest in science careers and their ability to dialogue with the public about topics of importance to science and society. While several public engagement training programs have been created and implemented in universities in the developed world, such opportunities are limited in developing countries. In their pursuit to develop appropriate public engagement training programs for their students, outreach providers and educators in developing countries will benefit from tried-and-tested training schemes from specific developing country contexts. In this paper, we describe the development, implementation, outcomes and possible extensions to an initiative to train budding scientists in a Ghanaian university to enable them to more effectively interact with the non-scientist public about the relevance of their research and the contribution of scientific endeavors to improving our daily lives. In order to address specific public engagement challenges identified in the target society, the program focuses on training students to become initiators of outreach activities who proactively seek engagement opportunities and can independently develop innovative events particularly for communities with poor public inclination to participate in scientific outreach.

Key Concept Ranking

Lead
0.86160725
Translation
0.54587454
Microscopy
0.5026316
0.86160725

References & Citations

1. Varner J2014Scientific outreach: toward effective public engagement with biological scienceBioScience6433334010.1093/biosci/biu021 http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biu021
2. Karikari TK, Yawson NA, Quansah E2016Developing science communication in Africa: undergraduate and graduate students should be trained and actively involved in outreach activity development and implementationJ Undergrad Neurosci Educ14E5E8273859324917354
3. Karikari TK, Yawson NA, Quansah E2016Build the future of science communication in developing countries through systematic training of young scientistsJ Microbiol Biol Educ17332732810.1128/jmbe.v17i3.1150 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v17i3.1150
4. Karikari TK2015Bioinformatics in Africa: the rise of Ghana?PLoS Comput Biol119e100430810.1371/journal.pcbi.1004308263789214574930 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004308
5. Wright GE, Adeyemo AA, Tiffin N2014Informed consent and ethical re-use of African genomic dataHum Genomics81810.1186/s40246-014-0018-7253391904445680 http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40246-014-0018-7
6. Devonshire IM, Hathway GJ2014Overcoming the barriers to greater public engagementPLoS Biol12e100176110.1371/journal.pbio.1001761244539393891597 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001761
7. Clark G, Russell J, Enyeart P, Gracia B, Wessel A, Jarmoskaite I, Polioudakis D, Stuart Y, Gonzalez T, MacKrell A, Rodenbusch S, Stovall GM, Beckham JT, Montgomery M, Tasneem T, Jones J, Simmons S, Roux S2016Science educational outreach programs that benefit students and scientistsPLoS Biol14e100236810.1371/journal.pbio.1002368268449914742226 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1002368
8. Devonshire IM, Davis J, Fairweather S, Highfield L, Thaker C, Walsh A, Wilson R, Hathway GJ2014Risk-based learning games improve long-term retention of information among school pupilsPLoS ONE9e10364010.1371/journal.pone.0103640250727994114878 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0103640
9. Goldina A, Weeks OI2014Science café course: an innovative means of improving communication skills of undergraduate biology majorsJ Microbiol Biol Educ15131710.1128/jmbe.v15i1.678248395104004733 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v15i1.678
10. De Mulder EFJ, Eder W, Mogessie A, Ahmed EAE, Da Costa PYD, Yabi I, Mathu E, Muhongo S, Cloetingh SAPL2014Geoscience outreach in Africa, 2007–2013J Afr Earth Sci99274375010.1016/j.jafrearsci.2013.11.011 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jafrearsci.2013.11.011
11. Yawson NA, Amankwaa AO, Tali B, Shang VO, Batu EN, Asiemoah KJr, Fuseini AD, Tene LN, Angaandi L, Blewusi I, Borbi M, Aduku LNE, Badu P, Abbey H, Karikari TK2016Evaluation of changes in Ghanaian students’ attitudes to science following neuroscience outreach activities: a means to identify effective ways to inspire interest in science careersJ Undergrad Neurosci Educ14A117A123273859204917342
12. Tindana P, Bull S, Amenga-Etego L, de Vries J, Aborigo R, Koram K, Kwiatkowski D, Parker M2012Seeking consent to genetic and genomic research in a rural Ghanaian setting: a qualitative study of the MalariaGEN experienceBMC Med Ethics131510.1186/1472-6939-13-15227478833441464 http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6939-13-15
13. Karikari TK, Yawson NA, Amankwaa AO2015Bridging the gap: introducing neuroscience to GhanaThe Biochemist3714647
14. Karikari TK2015Letter to the EditorJ Microbiol Biol Educ1613410.1128/jmbe.v16i1.801259497494416501 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.801
jmbe.v18i1.1244.citations
jmbe/18/1
content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1244
Loading

Citations loading...

Supplemental Material

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1244
2017-04-21
2017-12-11

Abstract:

Early involvement in public engagement activities may enhance undergraduate and graduate students’ long-term interest in science careers and their ability to dialogue with the public about topics of importance to science and society. While several public engagement training programs have been created and implemented in universities in the developed world, such opportunities are limited in developing countries. In their pursuit to develop appropriate public engagement training programs for their students, outreach providers and educators in developing countries will benefit from tried-and-tested training schemes from specific developing country contexts. In this paper, we describe the development, implementation, outcomes and possible extensions to an initiative to train budding scientists in a Ghanaian university to enable them to more effectively interact with the non-scientist public about the relevance of their research and the contribution of scientific endeavors to improving our daily lives. In order to address specific public engagement challenges identified in the target society, the program focuses on training students to become initiators of outreach activities who proactively seek engagement opportunities and can independently develop innovative events particularly for communities with poor public inclination to participate in scientific outreach.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmbe/18/1/jmbe-18-21.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1244&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

Click to view

FIGURE 1

A model for the development and implementation of scientific outreach activities. This model focuses on five principles: initiation, development, implementation, evaluation, and sharing. 1) Initiate. In an environment where scientist-community outreach partnerships are uncommon, scientists initiate outreach programs by approaching a potential audience to identify their interest and discuss possible activities. 2) Develop. After confirming support from the intended audience, outreach activities are developed, with special consideration for resources needed, who to collaborate with, source of funding, and outreach instructors. 3) Implement. Activities are delivered in an interactive manner, engaging the audience with relevant discussions around the theme. 4) Evaluate. Feedback from the audience is obtained and analyzed to determine how receptive they were to the activities and to inform the researchers as to whether the outreach aims were achieved. Feedback could be formal (e.g., using purpose-designed questionnaires) or informal (e.g., through unstructured word-of-mouth comments). 5) Share. Share outcomes with the wider public (such as through peer-reviewed publications, blog posts, social media, and online outreach databases) to support others in developing similar activities.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1244
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 2

Click to view

FIGURE 2

An example outreach activity developed and implemented following the model described in Figure 1 . Our trained student outreach providers followed this scientist-driven, evidence-based model to plan and implement a neuroscience-themed public engagement activity for high school students in Kumasi, Ghana, leading to beneficial impacts that can be built upon to improve scientist-public interactions in similar settings.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1244
Download as Powerpoint

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error