1887

Teaching the History of Microbiology and the Transformation of the Laboratory: A Study in Miniature

    Author: Linda S. Guthertz1
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    Affiliations: 1: Office of the State Laboratory Director, California Department of Public Health, Richmond, CA 94804
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 10 November 2016 Accepted 26 January 2017 Published 21 April 2017
    • ©2017 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: Office of the State Laboratory Director, California Department of Public Health, 850 Marina Bay Parkway, Richmond, CA 94804. Phone: 510-307-8922. E-mail: linda.guthertz@cdph.ca.gov.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1266
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    Abstract:

    This article presents a technique for bringing the history of microbiology to life in an exciting way. Eight miniature models were created, based on photographs or drawings, showing scientists at work in their labs. The models chosen represent important discoveries in microbiology, illustrating changes and advances in techniques and tools over the history of the discipline from 1600 through 2000. They serve as a novel and engaging teaching tool. While the instructor still presents the historic facts, the use of models provides the feeling of being there! They can also serve as a record for the future.

Key Concept Ranking

Environmental Microbiology
0.761122
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
0.5225614
Bacillus anthracis
0.5225614
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
0.5225614
0.761122

References & Citations

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2. Tamari F, Bonney KM, Polizzotto K2015Prop demonstrations in biology lectures facilitate student learning and performanceJ Microbiol Biol Educ16161210.1128/jmbe.v16i1.756259497514416506 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.756
3. Vallery-Radot R1916The life of PasteurDoubleday, Page & Co.New York, NY
4. Oren A2015Teaching microbiology to undergraduate students in the humanities and the social sciencesFEMS Microbiol Lett3621922010.1093/femsle/fnv162 http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/femsle/fnv162
5. 2010Hans and Zacharias Jansen: A complete microscope historyHistory-of-the-microscope.orgUKhttp://www.history-of-the-microscope.org/hans-andzacharias-jansen-microscope-history.php
6. Bordenave G2003Review: on the shoulders of giants. Louis Pasteur (1822–1895)Microbes Infect555356010.1016/S1286-4579(03)00075-312758285 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1286-4579(03)00075-3
7. Munch R2003Review: on the shoulders of giantsRobert Koch Microbes Infect56974
8. Jay V2001The legacy of Robert KochArch Pathol Lab Med1251148114911520262
9. Kimsey P2005Cutting-edge science underpins labsAPHL Minute22
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1266
2017-04-21
2017-08-22

Abstract:

This article presents a technique for bringing the history of microbiology to life in an exciting way. Eight miniature models were created, based on photographs or drawings, showing scientists at work in their labs. The models chosen represent important discoveries in microbiology, illustrating changes and advances in techniques and tools over the history of the discipline from 1600 through 2000. They serve as a novel and engaging teaching tool. While the instructor still presents the historic facts, the use of models provides the feeling of being there! They can also serve as a record for the future.

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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1a

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FIGURE 1a

The Delft laboratory of Antony van Leeuwenhoek.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1266
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Image of FIGURE 1b

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FIGURE 1b

Leeuwenhoek using his microscope.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1266
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Image of FIGURE 2a

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FIGURE 2a

Rue d’Ulm laboratory of Louis Pasteur.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1266
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FIGURE 2b

Pasteur examining his swan-neck flasks for microbial growth.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1266
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FIGURE 2c

Dr. Emile Roux working on the development of rabies treatment using the desiccated spinal cords of rabbits.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1266
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Image of FIGURE 3a

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FIGURE 3a

Laboratory of Robert Koch showing use of laboratory animals and beginnings of photomicrography.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1266
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Image of FIGURE 3b

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FIGURE 3b

Laboratory of Robert Koch showing first usage of water baths, incubators, and petri dishes.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1266
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FIGURE 4

Laboratory of Rosalind Franklin showing X-ray crystallography equipment. Shows a discussion on the shape of the DNA molecule with Watson, Crick, Gosling, and Wilkins.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1266
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Image of FIGURE 5a

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FIGURE 5a

Entrance to California Department of Public Health.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1266
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Image of FIGURE 5b

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FIGURE 5b

Microbial Diseases Laboratory building.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1266
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Image of FIGURE 5c

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FIGURE 5c

Enterics Laboratory Unit.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1266
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FIGURE 5d

Laboratory benchtop showing cultures and slides used in bacterial identification.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1266
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FIGURE 5e

Laboratory carts with cultures to be taken to workstations.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1266
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Image of FIGURE 6

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FIGURE 6

Present-day laboratory items in miniature.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2017 vol. 18 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1266
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