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Applied Theatre Facilitates Dialogue about Career Challenges for Scientists

    Authors: Verónica A. Segarra1,2, MariaElena Zavala1,3, Latanya Hammonds-Odie1,4,*
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    Affiliations: 1: Minorities Affairs Committee, American Society for Cell Biology, Bethesda, MD 20814; 2: Department of Biology, High Point University, High Point, NC 27268; 3: Department of Biology, California State University, Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330; 4: School of Science and Technology, Georgia Gwinnett College, Lawrenceville, GA 30043
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2017 vol. 18 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i2.1242
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    Abstract:

    The design of programs in support of a strong, diverse, and inclusive scientific workforce and academe requires numerous difficult conversations about sensitive topics such as the challenges scientists can face in their professional development. Theatre can be an interactive and effective way to foster discussion around such subjects. This article examines the implementation and benefits of such interactive strategies in different contexts, including the benefits of getting early career academics and professionals talking about some of the situations that women and underrepresented minorities face in the workplace, while allowing more seasoned professionals and colleagues to join in the conversation.

Key Concept Ranking

Chromosome Segregation
1.0
DNA
0.625
Meiosis
0.6115986
Inclusions
0.578125
1.0

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v18i2.1242
2017-05-26
2017-09-26

Abstract:

The design of programs in support of a strong, diverse, and inclusive scientific workforce and academe requires numerous difficult conversations about sensitive topics such as the challenges scientists can face in their professional development. Theatre can be an interactive and effective way to foster discussion around such subjects. This article examines the implementation and benefits of such interactive strategies in different contexts, including the benefits of getting early career academics and professionals talking about some of the situations that women and underrepresented minorities face in the workplace, while allowing more seasoned professionals and colleagues to join in the conversation.

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