1887

Artificial Urine for Teaching Urinalysis Concepts and Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infection in the Medical Microbiology Laboratory

    Authors: Latifa B. Khan1, Hannah M. Read1,2, Stephen R. Ritchie1,*, Thomas Proft1,2,*
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand; 2: Maurice Wilkins Centre for Molecular Biodiscovery, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. September 2017 vol. 18 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i2.1325
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
  • PDF
    844.04 Kb
  • XML
    43.56 Kb
  • HTML
    37.48 Kb

    Abstract:

    Dipstick urinalysis is an informative, quick, cost-effective and non-invasive diagnostic tool that is useful in clinical practice for the diagnosis of urinary tract infections (UTIs), kidney diseases, and diabetes. We used dipstick urinalysis as a hands-on microbiology laboratory exercise to reinforce student learning about UTIs with a particular focus on cystitis, which is a common bacterial infection. To avoid exposure to potentially contaminated human urine samples, we prepared artificial urine using easily acquired and affordable ingredients, which allowed less-experienced students to perform urinalysis without the risk of exposure to pathogenic organisms and ensured reliable availability of the urine samples. This practical class taught medical students how to use urinalysis data in conjunction with medical history to diagnose diseases from urine samples and to determine a treatment plan for clinical scenarios.

Key Concept Ranking

Infection and Immunity
0.80741906
Urinary Tract Infections
0.7166788
White Blood Cells
0.55599874
Sodium Nitrite
0.47319734
Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing
0.44479904
Chemicals
0.43560606
0.80741906

References & Citations

1. Ellis G2004Handling human samples is worth the riskScientist187
2. Sharp RH, Smailes DL1989A simulation of the blood type testAm Biol Teacher5123223310.2307/4448909 http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/4448909
3. Basso PJ, Tazinafo LF, Silva MF, Rocha MJ2014An alternative to the use of animals to teach diabetes mellitusAdv Physiol Educ3823523810.1152/advan.00051.2014251796134154263 http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/advan.00051.2014
4. Brooks T, Keevil CW1997A simple artificial urine for the growth of urinary pathogensLett Appl Microbiol2420320610.1046/j.1472-765X.1997.00378.x9080700 http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1472-765X.1997.00378.x
5. Chutipongtanate S, Thongboonkerd V2010Systematic comparisons of artificial urine formulas for in vitro cellular studyAnal Biochem40211011210.1016/j.ab.2010.03.03120347669 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ab.2010.03.031
6. Shmaefsky BR1990Artificial urine for laboratory testingAm Biol Teacher5217017210.2307/4449071 http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/4449071
7. Shmaefsky BR1995Artificial urine for laboratory testing: revisitedAm Biol Teacher5742843010.2307/4450032 http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/4450032
8. Dumonceaux M, Gamez M2016Rediscovering urine chemistry—and understanding its limitationsMed Lab Observerhttps://www.mlo-online.com/rediscovering-urine-chemistry%E2%80%94and-understanding-its-limitations
9. Andriole VT1987Urinary tract infections: recent developmentsJ Infect Dis15686586910.1093/infdis/156.6.8653316414 http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/infdis/156.6.865
10. Mambatta AK, Jayarajan J, Rashme VL, Harini S, Menon S, Kuppusamy J2015Reliability of dipstick assay in predicting urinary tract infectionJ Fam Med Prim Care426526810.4103/2249-4863.154672 http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2249-4863.154672
11. Schwalfenberg GK2012The alkaline diet: is there evidence that an alkaline pH diet benefits health?J Environ Public Health2012727630
jmbe.v18i2.1325.citations
jmbe/18/2
content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v18i2.1325
Loading

Citations loading...

Supplemental Material

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v18i2.1325
2017-09-01
2017-09-21

Abstract:

Dipstick urinalysis is an informative, quick, cost-effective and non-invasive diagnostic tool that is useful in clinical practice for the diagnosis of urinary tract infections (UTIs), kidney diseases, and diabetes. We used dipstick urinalysis as a hands-on microbiology laboratory exercise to reinforce student learning about UTIs with a particular focus on cystitis, which is a common bacterial infection. To avoid exposure to potentially contaminated human urine samples, we prepared artificial urine using easily acquired and affordable ingredients, which allowed less-experienced students to perform urinalysis without the risk of exposure to pathogenic organisms and ensured reliable availability of the urine samples. This practical class taught medical students how to use urinalysis data in conjunction with medical history to diagnose diseases from urine samples and to determine a treatment plan for clinical scenarios.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmbe/18/2/jmbe-18-46.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v18i2.1325&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

Click to view

FIGURE 1

Student materials: 10 mL each of Case A and Case B artificial urine samples, a timer, COMBUR-7 TEST strips, paper towel, and a discard jar for used strips.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. September 2017 vol. 18 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i2.1325
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 2

Click to view

FIGURE 2

COMBUR-7 TEST strips dipped in artificial urine samples for Case A and Case B.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. September 2017 vol. 18 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i2.1325
Download as Powerpoint

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error