1887

Development and Validation of the Microbiology for Health Sciences Concept Inventory

    Authors: Heather M. Seitz1,*, Rachel E. A. Horak2, Megan W. Howard3, Lucy W. Kluckhohn Jones4, Theodore Muth5, Christopher Parker6, Andrea Pratt Rediske7, Maureen M. Whitehurst8
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    Affiliations: 1: Johnson County Community College, Overland Park, KS 66220; 2: American Society for Microbiology, Washington, DC 20036; 3: Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH 43201; 4: Santa Monica College, Santa Monica, CA 90405; 5: CUNY Brooklyn College, Brooklyn, NY 11210; 6: Texas Wesleyan University, Fort Worth, TX 76105; 7: University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816; 8: Trident Technical College, Charleston, SC 29406
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 18 March 2017 Accepted 28 July 2017
    • Supplemental materials available at http://asmscience.org/jmbe
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Science Division, Johnson County Community College, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park, KS 66210-1299. Phone: 913-469-8500 (4375). E-mail: [email protected].
    • ©2017 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. October 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1322
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    Abstract:

    Identifying misconceptions in student learning is a valuable practice for evaluating student learning gains and directing educational interventions. By accurately identifying students’ knowledge and misconceptions about microbiology concepts, instructors can design effective classroom practices centered on student understanding. Following the development of ASM’s Curriculum Guidelines in 2012, we developed a concept inventory, the Microbiology for Health Sciences Concept Inventory (MHSCI), that measures learning gains and identifies student misconceptions in health sciences microbiology classrooms. The 23-question MHSCI was delivered to a wide variety of students at multiple institution types. Psychometric analysis identified that the MHSCI instrument is both discriminatory and reliable in measuring student learning gains. The MHSCI results correlated with course outcomes, showing the value of using the instrument alongside course level assessments to measure student learning. The MHSCI is a reliable and efficient way to measure student learning in microbiology and can be used both as a faculty development tool and an effective student assessment tool.

Key Concept Ranking

Environmental Microbiology
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Horizontal Gene Transfer
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Bacterial Cell Structure
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0.46604937

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2017-10-30
2018-09-20

Abstract:

Identifying misconceptions in student learning is a valuable practice for evaluating student learning gains and directing educational interventions. By accurately identifying students’ knowledge and misconceptions about microbiology concepts, instructors can design effective classroom practices centered on student understanding. Following the development of ASM’s Curriculum Guidelines in 2012, we developed a concept inventory, the Microbiology for Health Sciences Concept Inventory (MHSCI), that measures learning gains and identifies student misconceptions in health sciences microbiology classrooms. The 23-question MHSCI was delivered to a wide variety of students at multiple institution types. Psychometric analysis identified that the MHSCI instrument is both discriminatory and reliable in measuring student learning gains. The MHSCI results correlated with course outcomes, showing the value of using the instrument alongside course level assessments to measure student learning. The MHSCI is a reliable and efficient way to measure student learning in microbiology and can be used both as a faculty development tool and an effective student assessment tool.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Survey results from professional program faculty. A) Survey was sent to professional program faculty, and 35 faculty responded. The percentage of each faculty program is shown in the pie chart. B) Survey results from professional faculty on what the most important concepts were for students to understand for their professional program. Core concepts are written below the fundamental statement number for reference. Immuno = additional immunology related concepts; HPI = learning outcomes sourced from the Host Pathogen Interactions Concept Inventory ( 9 ); ASM = American Society for Microbiology.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. October 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1322
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FIGURE 2

Demographic data of students surveyed. A total of 322 students completed the demographics questions within the MHSCI. Questions included age, sex, race, number of semesters, intended major, and familiarity with the English language. A) Declared majors or programs identified by students. B) The distribution of ethnicity, self-reported by the student sample. C) The number of semesters completed, self-reported by students in the sample population.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. October 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1322
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FIGURE 3

Psychometric analysis of MHSCI. A) Overall student score on the pretest and posttest. The error bars represent standard error. The increase in scores is significant ( < 0.05). B) Item reliability for each question was calculated using the point-biserial coefficient. The acceptable value of 0.20 is shown in the dashed gray line. C) Analysis of pretest and posttest difficulty. Each point represents a single question on the MHSCI. Points above the line show an increase in P, which demonstrates an increase in the number of students answering the question correctly on the posttest. D) Analysis of pretest and posttest discrimination; values above the dotted line demonstrate questions that showed increased discrimination between students scoring in the bottom 25% and the top 25%. E) Test-Retest measure – difficulty values from two semesters at the same institution are plotted by question. Each dot represents a question on the MHSCI.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. October 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1322
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FIGURE 4

Correlation of MHSCI posttest score with institution type and demographic data. The curves represent the frequency of a given total score (0–23) for each group. A) Institution type, B) Gender, and C) Age.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. October 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1322
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FIGURE 5

Correlation of MHSCI with course level assessment. Student posttest scores on the MHSCI were plotted along with their exam score average at the end of the course. Each dot represents a single student. The dashed line represents the best fit line for the data.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. October 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1322
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