1887

Context Determines Strategies for ‘Activating’ the Inclusive Classroom

    Author: Bryan M. Dewsbury1
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    Affiliations: 1: The University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 01 May 2017 Accepted 21 September 2017 Published 15 December 2017
    • ©2017 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: 120 Flagg Road, CBS 483, Kingston, RI. Phone: 401-874-2248. Fax: 401-874-9107. E-mail: [email protected].
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1347
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    Abstract:

    A number of reports have called for the transformation of college science pedagogy. For instructors interested in transforming their own classrooms, the number of approaches, tools, and literature on pedagogical transformation can be overwhelming. The literature is rich with examples of the positive significant effects of active learning, but is lacking on frameworks that can help guide implementation. In this manuscript, I use Fink’s conceptual framework for “creating significant learning experiences” and a conceptual framework for inclusive teaching and learning to focus on how situation-specific drivers inform the choice of active learning strategies. I argue essentially that while, on average, active learning may promote greater academic outcomes, the context of the implementation matters. Using personal examples and evidence from the literature, I provide a Perspective here on why context considerations should be the main drivers of effective pedagogies.

Key Concept Ranking

Stems
0.8315815
Transformation
0.75
Elements
0.5169297
Roots
0.43161666
0.8315815

References & Citations

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1347
2017-12-15
2018-08-21

Abstract:

A number of reports have called for the transformation of college science pedagogy. For instructors interested in transforming their own classrooms, the number of approaches, tools, and literature on pedagogical transformation can be overwhelming. The literature is rich with examples of the positive significant effects of active learning, but is lacking on frameworks that can help guide implementation. In this manuscript, I use Fink’s conceptual framework for “creating significant learning experiences” and a conceptual framework for inclusive teaching and learning to focus on how situation-specific drivers inform the choice of active learning strategies. I argue essentially that while, on average, active learning may promote greater academic outcomes, the context of the implementation matters. Using personal examples and evidence from the literature, I provide a Perspective here on why context considerations should be the main drivers of effective pedagogies.

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