1887

Kinesthetically Exploring Chromosomes from Cell Division and Meiosis to Mendelian Genetics

    Author: Richard H. Heineman1
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    Affiliations: 1: Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA 19530
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. October 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1357
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    Abstract:

    Physical models are widely used to help students understand what happens to chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis. They can also be used to explicate the genotype-phenotype map. This laboratory exercise combines both these subjects at a level appropriate for a college-level genetics class. Students first trace the steps of mitosis and oogenesis, with special attention to ploidy and chromosome count. They then use the alleles arrived at by this process to build marshmallow creatures. Finally, they are introduced to more complicated modes of inheritance such as sex-linked traits, incomplete dominance, multiple alleles, and polygenic traits. Evidence of positive student attitudes and learning outcomes is presented.

Key Concept Ranking

Cell Division
0.62057906
Meiosis II
0.6027149
Meiosis I
0.5904146
Chromosomes
0.529356
Anaphase II
0.51263046
DNA
0.4375
0.62057906

References & Citations

1. Freeman S, Eddy SL, McDonough M, Smith MK, Okoroafor N, Jordt H, Wenderoth MP2014Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematicsProc Natl Acad Sci1118410841510.1073/pnas.1319030111248217564060654 http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1319030111
2. Flammer L2006ENSIWEBEvolution/Nature of Science InstitutesRetrieved May 2017 from http://www.indiana.edu/~ensiweb/lessons/gen.mm.html
3. Wright LK, Newman DL2011An interactive modeling lesson increases students’ understanding of ploidy during meiosisBiochem Mol Biol Educ3934435110.1002/bmb.2052321948506 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bmb.20523
4. Soderberg P1992Marshmallow meiosisSci Teach592831
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1357
2017-10-30
2017-11-19

Abstract:

Physical models are widely used to help students understand what happens to chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis. They can also be used to explicate the genotype-phenotype map. This laboratory exercise combines both these subjects at a level appropriate for a college-level genetics class. Students first trace the steps of mitosis and oogenesis, with special attention to ploidy and chromosome count. They then use the alleles arrived at by this process to build marshmallow creatures. Finally, they are introduced to more complicated modes of inheritance such as sex-linked traits, incomplete dominance, multiple alleles, and polygenic traits. Evidence of positive student attitudes and learning outcomes is presented.

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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

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FIGURE 1

Reebop cartoon. Lines connecting head and body pieces are toothpicks, with half-toothpicks used to attach mini-marshmallow humps.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. October 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1357
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FIGURE 2

Combined survey responses from both classes ( = 40–41; one student did not answer the memorization question). The proportion strongly agreeing or agreeing (light and dark green) is marked above each bar.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. October 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1357
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FIGURE 3

Average quiz scores before (black) and after (grey) lab exercise. Twenty students took quiz A first and B after the exercise, 20 students did the reverse, for a total of 40 pre- and post-exercise quizzes. The maximum score was 8. Quiz questions are available on request.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. October 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1357
Download as Powerpoint

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