1887

Teaching Genetic Linkage and Multiple Crossovers with Sets of Cards as Chromosomes

    Author: Richard H. Heineman1
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    Affiliations: 1: Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA 19530
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1366
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    Abstract:

    TMathematical models help students identify and understand underlying scientific patterns, while improving and reinforcing quantitative skills. However, they are often omitted from introductory undergraduate science classes. As a result, math-heavy theories, like optimal foraging theory, are often omitted from these classes. While optimal foraging easily fits into the curriculum of any class discussing food webs and energy transfer, this theory is often not explained until the graduate level. In this article, I describe a quantitative-rich lesson paired with a hands-on active learning module (or alternatively, a demonstration). This lesson was used in an introductory-level environmental science course but is suited for a range of biology and environmental science classes or laboratories.

Key Concept Ranking

Genetic Recombination
0.6656032
Chromosomes
0.53111464
Food web
0.42040682
0.6656032

References & Citations

1. Venema DR2006Enhancing undergraduate teaching and research with a Drosophila virginizing systemCBE Life Sci Educ535336010.1187/cbe.06-03-0152171460431681360 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.06-03-0152
2. Glase JC1995A study of gene linkage and mapping using tetrad analysis in the fungus Sordaria fimicola124 Goldman CATested studies for laboratory teaching16Proceedings of the 16th Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE)
3. Kindfield ACH1994Understanding a basic biological process: expert and novice models of meiosisSci Educ7825528310.1002/sce.3730780308 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/sce.3730780308
4. Gilliland WD, Rosenbaum MG2013Recombination calculations by branch diagramsGenetics Society of America Peer-Reviewed Education Portal (GSA PREP) 2013.002
5. Tsui CY, Treagust DF2013Introduction to multiple representations: their importance in biology and biological education318 Treagust DF, Tsui CYMultiple representations in biological education, models and modeling in science educationSpringerDordrecht10.1007/978-94-007-4192-8_1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-4192-8_1
6. Krauskopf S1999Doing the meiosis shuffleAm Biol Teach61606110.2307/4450612 http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/4450612
7. Haldane J1919The combination of linkage values and the calculation of distances between the loci of linked factorsJ Genet8299309
8. Vinod K2011Kosambi and the genetic mapping functionResonance1654055010.1007/s12045-011-0060-x http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12045-011-0060-x
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1366
2017-12-15
2018-01-24

Abstract:

TMathematical models help students identify and understand underlying scientific patterns, while improving and reinforcing quantitative skills. However, they are often omitted from introductory undergraduate science classes. As a result, math-heavy theories, like optimal foraging theory, are often omitted from these classes. While optimal foraging easily fits into the curriculum of any class discussing food webs and energy transfer, this theory is often not explained until the graduate level. In this article, I describe a quantitative-rich lesson paired with a hands-on active learning module (or alternatively, a demonstration). This lesson was used in an introductory-level environmental science course but is suited for a range of biology and environmental science classes or laboratories.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Crossover simulation. Students roll a six-sided die between each pair of cards (“genes”) in order (circled steps 1–4 above). Recombination occurs on a roll of 1 between genes and , and between and ; a roll of 1 or 2 yields recombination between gene and , and between and . Crossing over swaps all subsequent cards. In this example, there was recombination between genes and , causing the final chromosomes on the right.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2017 vol. 18 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v18i3.1366
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