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Reproducing Clinically Significant Multi-Organism Cultures to Improve Clinical Microbiology Education and Practice

    Authors: Rebecca Barr1, Mary Feller Davis1,*
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. February 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1351
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    Abstract:

    Medical microbiology courses focus on clinically relevant organisms, but designing laboratory experiments that mimic clinical specimens can be challenging. Many clinical specimens produce multi-organism cultures, which are difficult to reproducibly create in the academic laboratory. With experience with only single organism cultures, students may find it challenging to transition to the clinical laboratory where they must identify pathogens and normal flora from mixed cultures. Here, we present protocols for the creation of multi-organism cultures for mock wound, stool, urine, and throat cultures with medically relevant bacteria that allow these principles to be taught in an academic laboratory prior to clinical experiences.

References & Citations

1. Kiser K, Payne W, Taff T2011Clinical laboratory microbiology: a practical approachPearsonLondon
2. Tille P2013Bailey & Scott’s diagnostic microbiology13th editionMosbySt. Louis, MO
3. Baron EJ, Miller JM, Weinstein MP, Richter SS, Gilligan PH, Thomson RB, Bourbeau P, Carroll KC, Kehl SC, Dunne WM, Robinson-Dunn B, Schwartzman JD, Chapin KC, Snyder JW, Forbes BA, Patel R, Rosenblatt JE, Pritt BS2013A guide to utilization of the microbiology laboratory for diagnosis of infectious diseases: 2013 recommendations by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the American Society for Microbiology (ASM)Clin Infect Dis574e22e12110.1093/cid/cit278238459513719886 http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/cit278
4. Grice EA, Kong HH, Conlan S, Deming CB, Davis J, Young ACNISC Comparative Sequencing Program Bouffard GG, Blakesley RW, Murray PR, Green ED, Turner ML, Segre JA2009Topographical and temporal diversity of the human skin microbiomeScience32459311190119210.1126/science.1171700194781812805064 http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1171700
5. Leal SM, Jones M, Gilligan PH2016Clinical significance of commensal gram-positive rods routinely isolated from patient samplesJ Clin Microbiol54122928293610.1128/JCM.01393-16276299055121381 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.01393-16
6. Sanders ER11May2012Aseptic laboratory techniques: plating methodsJ Vis Exp JoVEhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4846335/10.3791/3064 http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/3064

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2018-02-16
2018-08-20

Abstract:

Medical microbiology courses focus on clinically relevant organisms, but designing laboratory experiments that mimic clinical specimens can be challenging. Many clinical specimens produce multi-organism cultures, which are difficult to reproducibly create in the academic laboratory. With experience with only single organism cultures, students may find it challenging to transition to the clinical laboratory where they must identify pathogens and normal flora from mixed cultures. Here, we present protocols for the creation of multi-organism cultures for mock wound, stool, urine, and throat cultures with medically relevant bacteria that allow these principles to be taught in an academic laboratory prior to clinical experiences.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

An overview of the general protocol.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. February 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1351
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Image of FIGURE 2

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FIGURE 2

Mixed pathogen wound culture with ( 1 ) and ( 2 ) A) Sheep blood agar (SBA): both organisms grow on this enriched media. colonies tend to be slightly larger and grayer, and colonies tend to be smaller and whiter. B) Bile esculin agar (BEA): neither organism grows on this selective agar. C) MacConkey agar (MAC): only grows on this Gram-negative selective media. Due to lactose fermentation by , pink colonies are observed. D) Mannitol salt agar (MSA): only grows on this selective agar. Due to mannitol fermentation by , yellow colonies are observed.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. February 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1351
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 3

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FIGURE 3

Mixed pathogen wound culture with ( 1 ) and ( 2 ) A) Sheep blood agar (SBA): both organisms grow on this enriched media, with as a larger colony and as a small colony. B) MacConkey agar (MAC): only grows on this Gram-negative selective media. Due to lactose fermentation by , pink colonies are observed. C) Mannitol salt agar (MSA): inhibited growth of can be seen in the first quadrant as small, yellow growth. D) Bile esculin agar: only grows on this selective agar. Due to hydrolysis of esculin by , black colonies are observed.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. February 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1351
Download as Powerpoint

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