1887

CLIPS (Communication Learning in Practice for Scientists): A New Online Resource Leverages Assessment to Help Students and Academics Improve Science Communication

    Authors: Susan Rowland1,2,*, James Hardy1, Kay Colthorpe3, Rhianna Pedwell1, Louise Kuchel4
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, 4072 Australia; 2: Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, 4072 Australia; 3: School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, 4072 Australia; 4: School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, 4072 Australia
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 01 September 2017 Accepted 09 November 2017 Published 30 March 2018
    • ©2018 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Building 76, School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Phone: +61 7 3365 3089. Email: s.rowland1@uq.edu.au.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. March 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1466
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
  • PDF
    216.47 Kb
  • XML
    32.38 Kb
  • HTML
    32.79 Kb

    Abstract:

    The ability to communicate is a crucial graduate outcome for science students; however, crowded curricula and large class sizes make it difficult to find time to explicitly teach foundational communication skills. In response to these challenges, we developed an online resource called Communication Learning in Practice for Scientists, or CLIPS. CLIPS provides a multi-point mentoring model that has allowed us to successfully integrate the teaching and learning of a complex set of tacitly-understood skills across multiple scientific disciplines. It also provides a flexible way for industry experts, academics, and students to learn from one another’s experiences of, and expertise in, science communication. CLIPS leverages the student focus on assessment; students access CLIPS for pragmatic, detailed, and consistent advice when undertaking assessment tasks. In creating CLIPS, our philosophy was that communication is the core business of any scientific practice, not an add-on after the event. Extensive, repeated use of CLIPS by both students and academics indicates that the resource and its delivery model are considered useful, respected, and impactful for, and by, the intended audiences. We have provided CLIPS to the science education community through www.clips.edu.au.

References & Citations

1. Bean JC2011Engaging ideas: the professor’s guide to integrating writing, critical thinking, and active learning in the classroom2nd editionJohn Wiley and Sons IncSan Francisco, CA
2. Deloitte Access Economics2014Australia’s stem workforce: a survey of employersOffice of the Chief ScientistCanberra, Australia
3. Mellors-Bourne R, Connor H, Jackson C2011Stem graduates in non stem jobsBIS Department for Business, Innovation and SkillsCambridge, UKhttp://dera.ioe.ac.uk/2664/2/A9R4454.pdf.
4. National Association of Colleges and EmployersJob outlook 2016: The attributes employers want to see on new college graduates’ resumeswww.naceweb.org/career-development/trends-and-predictions/job-outlook-2016-attributes-employers-want-to-see-on-new-college-graduates-resumes/
5. EU Skills Panorama ES2012Stem skills analytical highlightPrepared by ICF GHK for the European Commission. www.in.gr/files/1/2013/05/23/STEMskills_en.pdf
6. Jones S, Yates B, Kelder JA2011Science learning and teaching academic standards statement, September 2011Office for Learning and TeachingSydney, Australia
7. American Association for the Advancement of Science2011Vision and change in undergraduate biology education: a call to action: a summary of recommendations made at a national conference organized by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, July 15–17, 2009Washington, DC
8. Arkoudis S2014Integrating English language communication skills into disciplinary curricula: options and strategiesOffice for Learning and TeachingSydney, Australia
9. Colthorpe K, Zimbardi K, Bugarcic A, Smith A2015Progressive development of scientific literacy through assessment in inquiry-based biomedical science curriculaInt J Innov Sci Math Educ235264
10. Stevens S2013What communication skills are taught in Australian science degrees and what else do students learn from “communication to non-scientists” tasks?Honors thesisThe University of QueenslandSt Lucia
11. Mercer-Mapstone LD, Kuchel LJ2015Teaching scientists to communicate: evidence-based assessment for undergraduate science educationInt J Sci Educ371613163810.1080/09500693.2015.1045959 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09500693.2015.1045959
12. Kishbaugh TLS, Cessna S, Horst SJ, Leaman L, Flanagan T, Neufeld DG, Siderhurst M2012Measuring beyond content: a rubric bank for assessing skills in authentic research assignments in the sciencesChem Educ Res Pract1326827610.1039/C2RP00023G http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/C2RP00023G
13. Middendorf J, Pace D2004Decoding the disciplines: a model for helping students learn disciplinary ways of thinkingNew Direct Teach Learn98112
14. Bugarcic A, Colthorpe K, Zimbardi K, Su HW, Jackson K2014The development of undergraduate science students’ scientific argument skills in oral presentationsInt J Innov Sci Math Educ224360
15. Boud D1999Peer learning and assessmentAssess Eval Higher Educ2441342710.1080/0260293990240405 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0260293990240405
16. Hattie J2008Visible learningTaylor and Francis LtdLondon, UK
17. Irvine V, Code J, Richards L2013Realigning higher education for the 21st-century learner through multi-access learningMERLOT J Online Learn Teach9172186
18. Jean-Louis M2011Final report: engagement process for an Ontario Online Institutewww.ontla.on.ca/library/repository/mon/25007/311310.pdf
19. Pedwell RK, Hardy JA, Rowland SL2017Effective visual design and communication practices for research posters: exemplars based on the theory and practice of multimedia learning and rhetoricBiochem Mol Biol Educ4524926110.1002/bmb.21034 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bmb.21034

Supplemental Material

No supplementary material available for this content.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1466
2018-03-30
2018-07-18

Abstract:

The ability to communicate is a crucial graduate outcome for science students; however, crowded curricula and large class sizes make it difficult to find time to explicitly teach foundational communication skills. In response to these challenges, we developed an online resource called Communication Learning in Practice for Scientists, or CLIPS. CLIPS provides a multi-point mentoring model that has allowed us to successfully integrate the teaching and learning of a complex set of tacitly-understood skills across multiple scientific disciplines. It also provides a flexible way for industry experts, academics, and students to learn from one another’s experiences of, and expertise in, science communication. CLIPS leverages the student focus on assessment; students access CLIPS for pragmatic, detailed, and consistent advice when undertaking assessment tasks. In creating CLIPS, our philosophy was that communication is the core business of any scientific practice, not an add-on after the event. Extensive, repeated use of CLIPS by both students and academics indicates that the resource and its delivery model are considered useful, respected, and impactful for, and by, the intended audiences. We have provided CLIPS to the science education community through www.clips.edu.au.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmbe/19/1/jmbe-19-36.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1466&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

Click to view

FIGURE 1

The number and location of unique users of the CLIPS website for the month of July 2017. A total of 2,707 users from across 50 countries visited in July 2017.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. March 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1466
Download as Powerpoint

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error