1887

Building a Partnership with a Campus Communication Center

    Authors: Beth Beason-Abmayr1,*, Jennifer Shade Wilson2
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of BioSciences, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251-1892; 2: Center for Written, Oral, and Visual Communication, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 02 October 2017 Accepted 02 December 2017 Published 30 March 2018
    • ©2018 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Rice University, Department of BioSciences – MS 140, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892. Phone: 713-348-2535. E-mail: [email protected].
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. March 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1495
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    Abstract:

    Although abundant evidence in STEM education literature emphasizes the incorporation of both primary literature analysis and communication of science into the undergraduate classroom, biology educators are rarely given the necessary support to teach students how to present scientific data from primary literature. Consequently, students often receive limited training in this valuable skill. We report on a collaboration between a biosciences instructor and communication center director who together designed a workshop to teach undergraduate students in a laboratory course to present material from primary literature sources. The workshop taught content selection, slide design, and oral delivery skills using authentic, content-based materials and student models. Following the introduction of this workshop into the course, student performance on the presentations, including their apparent understanding of scientific concepts, improved noticeably. Establishing partnerships such as this one can improve the efforts of biology educators to teach effective science communication to our students.

References & Citations

1. American Association for the Advancement of Science 2011 Vision and change in undergraduate biology education: a call to action: a summary of recommendations made at a national conference organized by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, July 15–17, 2009 Washington, DC
2. Coil D, Wenderoth MP, Cunningham M, Dirks C 2010 Teaching the process of science: faculty perceptions and an effective methodology CBE Life Sci Educ 9 524 535 10.1187/cbe.10-01-0005 21123699 2995770 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.10-01-0005
3. Reynolds JA, Thaiss C, Katkin W, Thompson RJ 2012 Writing-to-learn in undergraduate science education: a community-based, conceptually driven approach CBE Life Sci Educ 11 17 25 10.1187/cbe.11-08-0064 22383613 3292059 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.11-08-0064
4. Balgopal M, Wallace A 2013 Writing-to-learn, writing-to-communicate, and scientific literacy Am Biol Teach 75 170 175 10.1525/abt.2013.75.3.5 http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/abt.2013.75.3.5
5. Bayer T, Curto K, Kriley C 2005 Acquiring expertise in discipline-specific discourse: an interdisciplinary exercise in learning to speak biology Across Discipl 2http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/articles/bayer_curto_kriley2005.cfm.
6. Kolber B Extended problem-based learning improves scientific communication in senior biology students J Coll Sci Teach 41 32 39
7. Bouquet EH 1999 “Our little secret”: a history of writing centers Coll Comp Commun 50 463 482
8. Bernstein D, Greenhoot AF 2014 Team-designed improvement of writing and critical thinking in large undergraduate courses Teach Learn Inq J 2 39 61 10.20343/teachlearninqu.2.1.39 http://dx.doi.org/10.20343/teachlearninqu.2.1.39
9. Morris WL 2006 Math in the writing center Clearing House 80 70 73 10.3200/TCHS.80.2.70-73 http://dx.doi.org/10.3200/TCHS.80.2.70-73
10. Glazer FS 2000 Journal clubs—a successful vehicle to science literacy J Coll Sci Teach 29 5 320 324
11. Kozeracki CA, Carey MF, Colicelli J, Levis-Fitzgerald M 2006 An intensive primary-literature-based teaching program directly benefits undergraduate science majors and facilitates their transition to doctoral programs CBE Life Sci Educ 5 340 347 10.1187/cbe.06-02-0144 17146041 1681356 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.06-02-0144
12. Kitazono AA 2010 A journal-club-based class that promotes active and cooperative learning of biology J Coll Sci Teach 40 20 27
13. Robertson K 2012 A journal club workshop that teaches undergraduates a systematic method for reading, interpreting, and presenting primary literature J Coll Sci Teach 41 25 31
14. Ellis R 1994 The study of second language acquisition Oxford University Press Oxford
15. Freedman A 1993 Show and tell? The role of explicit teaching in the learning of new genres Res Teach Eng 27 3 222 251
16. Charney DH, Carlson RA 1995 Learning to write in a genre: what student writers take from model texts Res Teach Eng 29 1 88 125
17. Hyland K 2004 Genre and second language writing University of Michigan Press Ann Arbor, MI 10.3998/mpub.23927 http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/mpub.23927
18. Freeman S, Eddy SL, McDonough M, Smith MK, Okoroafor N, Jordt H, Wenderoth MP 2014 Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics PNAS 11 8410 8415 10.1073/pnas.1319030111 http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1319030111
19. Ambrose SA, Bridges MW, DiPietro M, Lovett MC, Norman MK 2010 How learning works: seven research-based principles for smart teaching Jossey-Bass San Francisco, CA

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1495
2018-03-30
2019-03-24

Abstract:

Although abundant evidence in STEM education literature emphasizes the incorporation of both primary literature analysis and communication of science into the undergraduate classroom, biology educators are rarely given the necessary support to teach students how to present scientific data from primary literature. Consequently, students often receive limited training in this valuable skill. We report on a collaboration between a biosciences instructor and communication center director who together designed a workshop to teach undergraduate students in a laboratory course to present material from primary literature sources. The workshop taught content selection, slide design, and oral delivery skills using authentic, content-based materials and student models. Following the introduction of this workshop into the course, student performance on the presentations, including their apparent understanding of scientific concepts, improved noticeably. Establishing partnerships such as this one can improve the efforts of biology educators to teach effective science communication to our students.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Discussion of presentation issues directly addressed students’ mistakes in this course in the past. (A–C) Examples of slides used during the workshop. Additional workshop slides can be provided upon request.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. March 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1495
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Image of FIGURE 2

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FIGURE 2

Workshop slide. Students are asked to create parallel text for a typical scientific-methods slide. We use this same slide in workshops for both the journal club presentation in the upper-level synthetic biology lab and the research presentation in the freshmen introductory-level lab. After students have tried to revise the “not parallel” list themselves, we use animation to make the parallel list pop up. In the introductory lab, we also show a list from an actual student slide that is not parallel

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. March 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1495
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