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Key Concepts in Developmental Psychology and Science Pedagogy Help Undergraduates in High School Science Outreach

    Authors: Verónica A. Segarra1,*, Mariann Tillery2,*
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology, High Point University, High Point, NC 27268; 2: Stout School of Education, High Point University, High Point, NC 27268
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1508
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    Abstract:

    Science outreach often requires undergraduates to assume new roles as teachers, science communicators, role models, and mentors. Transitioning into these roles is a rewarding part of science outreach but can be daunting and challenging for students at this educational stage. We have created developmental psychology and science pedagogy primers to help ease these transitions for undergraduates. Students used these primers to learn about their audience before science outreach. Students also had the opportunity to converse with one another about the material provided in these primers during the planning stages of the outreach process. We find that becoming familiar with key concepts in developmental psychology and science pedagogy helps undergraduates get the most out of their science outreach experiences.

References & Citations

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2018-05-26

Abstract:

Science outreach often requires undergraduates to assume new roles as teachers, science communicators, role models, and mentors. Transitioning into these roles is a rewarding part of science outreach but can be daunting and challenging for students at this educational stage. We have created developmental psychology and science pedagogy primers to help ease these transitions for undergraduates. Students used these primers to learn about their audience before science outreach. Students also had the opportunity to converse with one another about the material provided in these primers during the planning stages of the outreach process. We find that becoming familiar with key concepts in developmental psychology and science pedagogy helps undergraduates get the most out of their science outreach experiences.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Undergraduate student expectations from science outreach. Sixteen undergraduates majoring in Biology at High Point University, a private liberal arts institution, were asked to describe their expectations from participation in a collaborative high school science outreach program described in detail elsewhere ( 7 ). Student responses were coded into the different categories presented in the figure by four different researchers.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1508
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Image of FIGURE 2

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FIGURE 2

Undergraduates engaging in science outreach are often new to mentoring in the sciences. Sixteen undergraduates majoring in Biology (same population surveyed for Fig. 1 ) at High Point University, a private liberal arts institution, were asked to describe their prior academic and science mentoring experiences. These undergraduates participated in a collaborative high school science outreach program described in detail elsewhere ( 7 ). Answers were coded and quantified.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1508
Download as Powerpoint

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