1887

Laboratory Activity Using Accessible Microfluidics to Study Nematode Behavior in an Electrical Field

    Authors: Elizabeth D. Clawson1, Val Blair1,*, Julia F. Nepper2, Matthew D. Stilwell2, Travis Tangen3, Douglas B. Weibel2,4,5
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Morgridge Institute for Research, Madison, WI 53715; 2: Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706; 3: Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, Madison, WI 53726; 4: Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706; 5: Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1551
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
  • HTML
    27.42 Kb
  • XML
    24.64 Kb
  • PDF
    1.13 MB

    Abstract:

    Microfluidic devices are used in a broad range of technological applications, from creating ingredients for cosmetics to discovering new medicines. The small size of microfluidic channels makes it possible to isolate individual cells, collections of cells, and multicellular organisms and study their biology, ecology, and behavior. Microfluidics is particularly well suited to teaching students concepts from different fields of science. A challenge with conventional microfluidic devices is that they are difficult and expensive to make, which has been a barrier for their entry into curricula and classrooms. We describe a simple and low-cost method for creating microfluidic devices and use them to study the behavior of nematodes in an electrical field. Nematodes are ecologically and agriculturally important organisms that respond robustly to various environmental cues. In this activity, we demonstrate that nematodes swim through liquid in microfluidic channels in response to an applied electric field and describe student responses to this activity.

References & Citations

1. Whitesides GM2006The origins and the future of microfluidicsNature44236837310.1038/nature0505816871203 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature05058
2. Friend J, Yeo L2010Fabrication of microfluidic devices using polydimethylsiloxaneBiomicrofluidics4202650210.1063/1.3259624206975752917889 http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3259624
3. Yuen PK, Goral VN2010Low-cost rapid prototyping of flexible microfluidic devices using a desktop digital craft cutterLab Chip1038438710.1039/B918089C20091012 http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/B918089C
4. Stilwell MD, Nepper JF, Clawson ED, Blair V, Tangen T, Weibel DB2017Exploring predatory nematode chemotaxis using low-cost and easy-to-use microfluidicsAm Biol Teach44975376210.1525/abt.2017.79.9.753 http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/abt.2017.79.9.753
5. Shapiro-Ilan DI, Han R, Dolinksi C2012Entomopathogenic nematode production and application technologyJ Nematol442206217
6. Griff in CT2012Perspectives on the behavior of entomopathogenic nematodes from dispersal to reproduction: traits contributing to nematode fitness and biocontrol efficacyJ Nematol442177184
7. Shapiro-Ilan DI, Gaugler RNematodesBiological control: a guide to natural enemies in North AmericaCornell University College of Agricultural and Life Sciencesn.d. Web25May2017https://biocontrol.entomology.cornell.edu/pathogens/nematodes.php
8. Dillman AR, Guillermin ML, Lee JH, Kim B, Sternberg PW, Hallem EA2012Olfaction shapes host–parasite interactions in parasitic nematodesProc Natl Acad Sci10935E2324E233310.1073/pnas.1211436109228517673435218 http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1211436109
9. Hallem EA, Dillman AR, Hong AV, Zhang Y, Yano JM, DeMarco SF, Sternberg PW2011A sensory code for host seeking in parasitic nematodesCurr Biol21537738310.1016/j.cub.2011.01.048213535583152378 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2011.01.048
10. Ilan T, Kim-Shapiro DB, Bock CH, Shapiro-Ilan DI2013Magnetic and electric fields induce directional responses in Steinernema carpocapsaeInt J Parasitol431078178410.1016/j.ijpara.2013.05.00723792299 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpara.2013.05.007
11. Shapiro-Ilan DI, Lewis EE, Campbell JF, Kim-Shapiro DB2011Directional movement of entomopathogenic nematodes in response to electrical field: effects of species, magnitude of voltage, and infective juvenile ageJ Invertebr Pathol109344010.1016/j.jip.2011.09.00421945052 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jip.2011.09.004

Supplemental Material

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1551
2018-04-27
2018-05-26

Abstract:

Microfluidic devices are used in a broad range of technological applications, from creating ingredients for cosmetics to discovering new medicines. The small size of microfluidic channels makes it possible to isolate individual cells, collections of cells, and multicellular organisms and study their biology, ecology, and behavior. Microfluidics is particularly well suited to teaching students concepts from different fields of science. A challenge with conventional microfluidic devices is that they are difficult and expensive to make, which has been a barrier for their entry into curricula and classrooms. We describe a simple and low-cost method for creating microfluidic devices and use them to study the behavior of nematodes in an electrical field. Nematodes are ecologically and agriculturally important organisms that respond robustly to various environmental cues. In this activity, we demonstrate that nematodes swim through liquid in microfluidic channels in response to an applied electric field and describe student responses to this activity.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmbe/19/1/jmbe-19-58.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1551&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

Click to view

FIGURE 1

Diagram of nematodes in zones under microscope. Nematodes respond to an applied electric field by moving through different zones of a microfluidic channel.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1551
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 2

Click to view

FIGURE 2

Microfluidic setup for the electrotaxis activity. A 9V battery supplies an electric field across a microfluidic channel.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1551
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 3

Click to view

FIGURE 3

Activity Concept Map. An overview of suggested preparation and timing for activity (see Appendix 5 for full size image).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1551
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 4

Click to view

FIGURE 4

Analysis of student engagement (=40). An engagement score of 3 or above is considered to be a high level of engagement based on the validated activation survey.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. April 2018 vol. 19 no. 1 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1551
Download as Powerpoint

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error