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Investigation of a Stand-Alone Online Learning Module for Cellular Respiration Instruction

    Authors: Eric E. Goff1, Katie M. Reindl2, Christina Johnson3, Phillip McClean3, Erika G. Offerdahl4, Noah L. Schroeder5, Alan R. White1,*
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208; 2: Department of Biological Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58102; 3: Department of Plant Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58102; 4: School of Molecular Biosciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99163; 5: Department of Leadership Studies in Education and Organizations, Wright State University, Dayton, OH 45435
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. June 2018 vol. 19 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i2.1460
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    Abstract:

    With the recent rise of alternative instructional methodologies such as flipped classrooms and active learning, many core concepts are being introduced outside of the classroom prior to scheduled class meeting times. One popular means for external concept introduction in many undergraduate biology courses is the use of stand-alone online learning modules. Using a group of four large introductory biology course sections, we investigate the use of a stand-alone online learning module developed using animations from Virtual Cell Animation Collection as a resource for the introduction of cellular respiration concepts outside of the classroom. Results from four sections of introductory biology ( = 629) randomized to treatments show that students who interacted with the stand-alone online learning module had significantly higher normalized gain scores on a cellular respiration assessment than students who only attended a traditional lecture as a means of concept introduction ( < 0.001, = 0.59). These findings suggest a superior ability to convey certain introductory cellular respiration topics in a stand-alone manner outside of the classroom than in a more traditional lecture-based classroom setting.

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2018-06-29
2018-07-18

Abstract:

With the recent rise of alternative instructional methodologies such as flipped classrooms and active learning, many core concepts are being introduced outside of the classroom prior to scheduled class meeting times. One popular means for external concept introduction in many undergraduate biology courses is the use of stand-alone online learning modules. Using a group of four large introductory biology course sections, we investigate the use of a stand-alone online learning module developed using animations from Virtual Cell Animation Collection as a resource for the introduction of cellular respiration concepts outside of the classroom. Results from four sections of introductory biology ( = 629) randomized to treatments show that students who interacted with the stand-alone online learning module had significantly higher normalized gain scores on a cellular respiration assessment than students who only attended a traditional lecture as a means of concept introduction ( < 0.001, = 0.59). These findings suggest a superior ability to convey certain introductory cellular respiration topics in a stand-alone manner outside of the classroom than in a more traditional lecture-based classroom setting.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Experimental design assessing the effectiveness of the cellular respiration learning module developed from VCell animations as a stand-alone tool in introductory biology.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. June 2018 vol. 19 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i2.1460
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Image of FIGURE 2

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FIGURE 2

Mean normalized gain scores on the topic of cellular respiration by treatment type. Bold lines represents group means, distribution is represented by width of the plot. *** indicates < 0.001.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. June 2018 vol. 19 no. 2 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i2.1460
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