1887

The PARE Project: A Short Course-Based Research Project for National Surveillance of Antibiotic-Resistant Microbes in Environmental Samples

    Authors: Elizabeth A. Genné-Bacon1, Carol A. Bascom-Slack1,*
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Center for Translational Science Education, Department of Medical Education, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Received 13 March 2018 Accepted 18 September 2018 Published 31 October 2018
    • ©2018 Author(s). Published by the American Society for Microbiology.
    • [open-access] This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), which grants the public the nonexclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the published work.

    • Supplemental materials available at http://asmscience.org/jmbe
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Center for Translational Science Education, Department of Medical Education, Tufts University School of Medicine, 136 Harrison Ave., Boston, MA 02111. Phone: 617-636-2479. Fax: 617-636-0375. E-mail: [email protected].
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. October 2018 vol. 19 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i3.1603
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    Abstract:

    Course-based research experiences (CREs) have been proposed as an inclusive model to expose all students, including those at institutions without a strong research infrastructure, to research at an early stage. Converting an entire semester-long course can be time consuming for instructors and expensive for institutions, so we have developed a short CRE that can be implemented in a variety of life science course types. The Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance in the Environment (PARE) project uses common microbiology methods and equipment to engage students in nationwide surveillance of environmental soil samples to document the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The project has been implemented at institutions ranging from community colleges to doctoral-granting institutions in 30 states plus Puerto Rico. Programmatic feedback was obtained from instructors over three iterations, and revisions were made based on this feedback. Student learning was measured by pre/post assessment in a subset of institutions. Outcomes indicate that students made significant gains in the project learning goals. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education

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2018-10-31
2018-12-18

Abstract:

Course-based research experiences (CREs) have been proposed as an inclusive model to expose all students, including those at institutions without a strong research infrastructure, to research at an early stage. Converting an entire semester-long course can be time consuming for instructors and expensive for institutions, so we have developed a short CRE that can be implemented in a variety of life science course types. The Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance in the Environment (PARE) project uses common microbiology methods and equipment to engage students in nationwide surveillance of environmental soil samples to document the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The project has been implemented at institutions ranging from community colleges to doctoral-granting institutions in 30 states plus Puerto Rico. Programmatic feedback was obtained from instructors over three iterations, and revisions were made based on this feedback. Student learning was measured by pre/post assessment in a subset of institutions. Outcomes indicate that students made significant gains in the project learning goals. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education

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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1

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FIGURE 1

Overview of the PARE methods. PARE = prevalence of antibiotic resistance in the environment.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. October 2018 vol. 19 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i3.1603
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Image of FIGURE 2

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FIGURE 2

Sample data—serial dilution plating sets. A) Nutrient agar. The top photo shows the entire plating series. The bottom images show individual plates with diverse colony morphology rendering accurate enumeration difficult. B) MacConkey agar. The bottom images show the more uniform colony morphology of MacConkey agar.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. October 2018 vol. 19 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i3.1603
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Image of FIGURE 3

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FIGURE 3

Student learning after the PARE module. Bars represent average scores with standard mean error. Pre and post tests are identical, and scores are out of 13.25 possible points. A paired -test reveals a significant ( < 0.0001) effect of the PARE experience on post test scores. = 43, **** < 0.0001. PARE = prevalence of antibiotic resistance in the environment.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. October 2018 vol. 19 no. 3 doi:10.1128/jmbe.v19i3.1603
Download as Powerpoint

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