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Vaccination of Cattle against O157:H7

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  • Author: David R. Smith1
  • Editors: Vanessa Sperandio2, Carolyn J. Hovde3
  • VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762-6100; 2: University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX; 3: University of Idaho, Moscow, ID
  • Source: microbiolspec November 2014 vol. 2 no. 6 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.EHEC-0006-2013
  • Received 01 May 2013 Accepted 28 August 2013 Published 14 November 2014
  • David R. Smith, dsmith@cvm.msstate.edu
image of Vaccination of Cattle against <span class="jp-italic">Escherichia coli</span> O157:H7
  • Abstract:

    Human infection with Shiga toxin-producing O157:H7 (STEC O157) is relatively rare, but the consequences can be serious, especially in the very young and the elderly. Efforts to control the flow of STEC O157 during beef processing have meaningfully reduced the incidence of human STEC O157 infection, particularly prior to 2005. Unfortunately, despite early progress, the incidence of STEC O157 infection has not changed meaningfully or statistically in recent years, suggesting that additional actions, for example, targeting the cattle reservoir, are necessary to further reduce STEC O157 illness. Ideally, preharvest interventions against STEC O157 should reduce the likelihood that cattle carry the organism, have practical application within the beef production system, and add sufficient value to the cattle to offset the cost of the intervention. A number of STEC O157 antigens are being investigated as potential vaccine targets. Some vaccine products have demonstrated efficacy to reduce the prevalence of cattle carrying STEC O157 by making the gut unfavorable to colonization. However, in conditions of natural exposure, efficacy afforded by vaccination depends on how the products are used to control environmental transmission within groups of cattle and throughout the production system. Although cattle vaccines against STEC O157 have gained either full or preliminary regulatory approval in Canada and the United States, widespread use by cattle feeders is unlikely until there is an economic signal to indicate that cattle vaccinated against STEC O157 are valued over other cattle.

  • Citation: Smith D. 2014. Vaccination of Cattle against O157:H7. Microbiol Spectrum 2(6):EHEC-0006-2013. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.EHEC-0006-2013.

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2014-11-14
2018-07-16

Abstract:

Human infection with Shiga toxin-producing O157:H7 (STEC O157) is relatively rare, but the consequences can be serious, especially in the very young and the elderly. Efforts to control the flow of STEC O157 during beef processing have meaningfully reduced the incidence of human STEC O157 infection, particularly prior to 2005. Unfortunately, despite early progress, the incidence of STEC O157 infection has not changed meaningfully or statistically in recent years, suggesting that additional actions, for example, targeting the cattle reservoir, are necessary to further reduce STEC O157 illness. Ideally, preharvest interventions against STEC O157 should reduce the likelihood that cattle carry the organism, have practical application within the beef production system, and add sufficient value to the cattle to offset the cost of the intervention. A number of STEC O157 antigens are being investigated as potential vaccine targets. Some vaccine products have demonstrated efficacy to reduce the prevalence of cattle carrying STEC O157 by making the gut unfavorable to colonization. However, in conditions of natural exposure, efficacy afforded by vaccination depends on how the products are used to control environmental transmission within groups of cattle and throughout the production system. Although cattle vaccines against STEC O157 have gained either full or preliminary regulatory approval in Canada and the United States, widespread use by cattle feeders is unlikely until there is an economic signal to indicate that cattle vaccinated against STEC O157 are valued over other cattle.

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