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Measles in the United States since the Millennium: Perils and Progress in the Postelimination Era

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  • Authors: Anne Schuchat1, Amy Parker Fiebelkorn2, William Bellini3
  • Editors: W. Michael Scheld4, James M. Hughes5, Richard J. Whitley6
  • VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: The National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329; 2: Division of Viral Diseases, The National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329; 3: Division of Viral Diseases, The National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329; 4: Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA; 5: Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA; 6: Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL
  • Source: microbiolspec April 2016 vol. 4 no. 2 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.EI10-0006-2015
  • Received 22 October 2015 Accepted 12 November 2015 Published 08 April 2016
  • Anne Schuchat, ACS1@cdc.gov
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  • Abstract:

    This article describes measles and measles vaccination, along with the challenges, successes, and progress in the postelimination era.

  • Citation: Schuchat A, Fiebelkorn A, Bellini W. 2016. Measles in the United States since the Millennium: Perils and Progress in the Postelimination Era. Microbiol Spectrum 4(2):EI10-0006-2015. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.EI10-0006-2015.

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2016-04-08
2017-08-24

Abstract:

This article describes measles and measles vaccination, along with the challenges, successes, and progress in the postelimination era.

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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

Measles, United States, 1962 to 2014. (Adapted from reference 1 with permission.)

Source: microbiolspec April 2016 vol. 4 no. 2 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.EI10-0006-2015
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Measles virus-containing vaccine coverage among 19- to 35-month-olds (Immunization Information Survey, 1967 to 1985, and National Immunization Survey, 1994 to 2014 [ 17 ]) and among 13- to 17-year-olds (NIS-teen), ( 18 ) by year. (Adapted from references 17 , 18 with permission.)

Source: microbiolspec April 2016 vol. 4 no. 2 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.EI10-0006-2015
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Image of FIGURE 3
FIGURE 3

Reported cases of measles by region of importation, 2001 to 2015. (Adapted from reference 20 with permission.)

Source: microbiolspec April 2016 vol. 4 no. 2 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.EI10-0006-2015
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Image of FIGURE 4
FIGURE 4

Map of imported measles cases, by state, 2001 to 2015. (Source, Division of Viral Diseases, CDC [ 51 ].)

Source: microbiolspec April 2016 vol. 4 no. 2 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.EI10-0006-2015
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Tables

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TABLE 1

Characteristics of recent outbreaks of measles in the United States with >20 cases

Source: microbiolspec April 2016 vol. 4 no. 2 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.EI10-0006-2015
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TABLE 2

Comparison of key variables from measles cases reported during 2001 to 2008 versus 2009 to 2014

Source: microbiolspec April 2016 vol. 4 no. 2 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.EI10-0006-2015

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