1887
No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.

Infections Associated with Exotic Cuisine: The Dangers of Delicacies

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
Buy this Microbiology Spectrum Article
Price Non-Member $15.00
  • Authors: Natasha S. Hochberg1, Nahid Bhadelia2
  • Editor: David Schlossberg3
  • VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118; 2: Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118; 3: Philadelphia Health Department, Philadelphia, PA
  • Source: microbiolspec September 2015 vol. 3 no. 5 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0010-2015
  • Received 16 March 2015 Accepted 16 April 2015 Published 04 September 2015
  • Natasha S. Hochberg, nhoch@bu.edu
image of Infections Associated with Exotic Cuisine: The Dangers of Delicacies
    Preview this microbiology spectrum article:
    Zoom in
    Zoomout

    Infections Associated with Exotic Cuisine: The Dangers of Delicacies, Page 1 of 2

    | /docserver/preview/fulltext/microbiolspec/3/5/IOL5-0010-2015-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/microbiolspec/3/5/IOL5-0010-2015-2.gif
  • Abstract:

    “Exotic” food dishes are an expression of regional culture, religion, and ethnicity worldwide. With the increase in international travel to remote areas of the world, globalization of the food supply, and changes in food habits, more people are consuming dishes once considered exotic. Such behavioral changes require awareness by consumers and clinicians about the risks of food-borne infections. This chapter addresses pathogens associated with consumption of raw or undercooked seafood including anisakidosis, infection, flukes, and other infectious and toxin-mediated diseases. We discuss the geographic distribution of the pathogens, symptomatology, and basic principles of treatment. Food products derived from turtles, snakes, and other reptiles are reviewed, and we address the risk of gnathostomiasis, sparganosis, trichinellosis, and other pathogens. In discussing infections associated with undercooked beef, pork, and bush meat, we address dysentery, amebiasis, toxoplasmosis, infections, and risks of novel viral infections, among others. We also review infectious risks from poultry, dairy, and other food items, focusing on those organisms encountered less frequently by clinicians in developed countries. The wide range of infectious organisms related to exotic cuisine underscores the importance of educating the adventurous traveler and warrants continued vigilance on the part of the clinician.

  • Citation: Hochberg N, Bhadelia N. 2015. Infections Associated with Exotic Cuisine: The Dangers of Delicacies. Microbiol Spectrum 3(5):IOL5-0010-2015. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0010-2015.

Key Concept Ranking

Central Nervous System Diseases
0.57176685
Meat and Meat Products
0.4569819
0.57176685

References

1. Djurkovic-Djakovic O, Bobic B, Nikolic A, Klun I, Dupouy-Camet J. 2013. Pork as a source of human parasitic infection. Clin Microbiol Infect 19:586–594. [PubMed][CrossRef]
2. Fried B, Abruzzi A. 2010. Food-borne trematode infections of humans in the United States of America. Parasit Res 106:1263–1280. [PubMed][CrossRef]
3. Fürst T, Duthaler U, Sripa B, Utzinger J, Keiser J. 2012. Trematode infections: liver and lung flukes. Infect Dis Clin N Am 26:399–419. [PubMed][CrossRef]
4. Gessain A, Rua R, Betsem E, Turpin J, Mahieux R. 2013. HTLV-3/4 and simian foamy retroviruses in humans: discovery, epidemiology, cross-species transmission and molecular virology. Virology 435:187–199. [PubMed][CrossRef]
5. Hochberg NS, Hamer DH. 2010. Anisakidosis: perils of the deep. Clin Infect Dis 51:806–812. [PubMed][CrossRef]
6. Johnson JR. 2011. Foodborne illness acquired in the United States. Emerg Infect Dis 17:1338–1339. [PubMed][CrossRef]
7. Magnino S, Colin P, Dei-Cas E, Madsen M, McLauchlin J, Nöckler K, Maradona MP, Tsigarida E, Vanopdenbosch E, Van Peteghem C. 2009. Biological risks associated with consumption of reptile products. Int J Food Microbiol 134:163–175. [PubMed][CrossRef]
8. Musher DM, Musher BL. 2004. Contagious acute gastrointestinal infections. N Engl J Med 351:2417–2427. [PubMed][CrossRef]
9. Nawa Y, Hatz C, Blum J. 2005. Sushi delights and parasites: the risk of fishborne and foodborne parasitic zoonoses in Asia. Clin Infect Dis 41:1297–1303. [PubMed][CrossRef]
10. Ross AG, Olds GR, Cripps AW, Farrar JJ, McManus DP. 2013. Enteropathogens and chronic illness in returning travelers. N Engl J Med 358:1817–1825. [PubMed][CrossRef]
microbiolspec.IOL5-0010-2015.citations
cm/3/5
content/journal/microbiolspec/10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0010-2015
Loading

Citations loading...

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/microbiolspec/10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0010-2015
2015-09-04
2017-12-15

Abstract:

“Exotic” food dishes are an expression of regional culture, religion, and ethnicity worldwide. With the increase in international travel to remote areas of the world, globalization of the food supply, and changes in food habits, more people are consuming dishes once considered exotic. Such behavioral changes require awareness by consumers and clinicians about the risks of food-borne infections. This chapter addresses pathogens associated with consumption of raw or undercooked seafood including anisakidosis, infection, flukes, and other infectious and toxin-mediated diseases. We discuss the geographic distribution of the pathogens, symptomatology, and basic principles of treatment. Food products derived from turtles, snakes, and other reptiles are reviewed, and we address the risk of gnathostomiasis, sparganosis, trichinellosis, and other pathogens. In discussing infections associated with undercooked beef, pork, and bush meat, we address dysentery, amebiasis, toxoplasmosis, infections, and risks of novel viral infections, among others. We also review infectious risks from poultry, dairy, and other food items, focusing on those organisms encountered less frequently by clinicians in developed countries. The wide range of infectious organisms related to exotic cuisine underscores the importance of educating the adventurous traveler and warrants continued vigilance on the part of the clinician.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

larvae embedded in the flesh of cod. Photograph courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Division of Parasitic Diseases (CDC-DPDx). doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0010-2015.f1

Source: microbiolspec September 2015 vol. 3 no. 5 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0010-2015
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

life cycle. Courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Division of Parasitic Diseases (CDC-DPDx). doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0010-2015.f2

Source: microbiolspec September 2015 vol. 3 no. 5 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0010-2015
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE 1

Infections associated with exotic raw or undercooked fish dishes

Source: microbiolspec September 2015 vol. 3 no. 5 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0010-2015
Generic image for table
TABLE 2

Infections associated with exotic reptile dishes

Source: microbiolspec September 2015 vol. 3 no. 5 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0010-2015
Generic image for table
TABLE 3

Infections associated with exotic raw or undercooked meat dishes

Source: microbiolspec September 2015 vol. 3 no. 5 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0010-2015

Supplemental Material

No supplementary material available for this content.

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error