1887
No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.

Infections Acquired via Fresh Water: From Lakes to Hot Tubs

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
Buy this Microbiology Spectrum Article
Price Non-Member $15.00
  • Author: Bertha Ayi1
  • Editor: David Schlossberg3
  • VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Global Infectious Disease Services, PC, Sioux City, IA 51104; 2: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-4330; 3: Philadelphia Health Department, Philadelphia, PA
  • Source: microbiolspec November 2015 vol. 3 no. 6 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015
  • Received 07 July 2015 Accepted 17 July 2015 Published 25 November 2015
  • Bertha Ayi, serwabb@hotmail.com
image of Infections Acquired via Fresh Water: From Lakes to Hot Tubs
    Preview this microbiology spectrum article:
    Zoom in
    Zoomout

    Infections Acquired via Fresh Water: From Lakes to Hot Tubs, Page 1 of 2

    | /docserver/preview/fulltext/microbiolspec/3/6/IOL5-0019-2015-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/microbiolspec/3/6/IOL5-0019-2015-2.gif
  • Abstract:

    This chapter is unique in its focus on infections that are acquired in water. For those who like to swim and spend time in water parks and pools, the exposure to water and therefore the risk of infection is higher. Recreational water illnesses are illnesses related to recreation in water. Of these recreational water illnesses, infections are the most common because water laden with microorganisms or contaminated by human activity gains access to healthy tissue through the skin and body orifices. Infection occurs by inhalation, ingestion, or direct invasion of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal infections are the most common. This chapter discusses skin and soft tissue infections, ocular infections, urinary tract infections, pulmonary infections, central nervous system infections, and disseminated infections that can occur as people come into contact with natural nonmarine water bodies as well as manmade aquatic environments. Most of these infections are mild but can occasionally be life threatening. There is a focus on the latest methods to treat these infections. is a very common pathogen in water. The chapter discusses dermatitis at length and also looks at keratitis and pneumonia caused by this organism. The chapter also discusses the latest treatments for primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, a severe life-threatening illness with a high mortality, caused by . Finally, there is an in-depth discussion of the notorious gastrointestinal illnesses such as norovirus and that can affect large numbers of people at a time.

  • Citation: Ayi B. 2015. Infections Acquired via Fresh Water: From Lakes to Hot Tubs. Microbiol Spectrum 3(6):IOL5-0019-2015. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015.

Key Concept Ranking

Upper Respiratory Tract Infections
0.4409149
Lower Respiratory Tract Infections
0.43860513
Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism
0.4112835
Indirect Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
0.40431306
0.4409149

References

1. Aronson JD. 1926. Spontaneous tuberculosis in saltwater fish. J Infect Dis 39:315–319. [CrossRef]
2. Bisno AL. 1984. Cutaneous infections: microbiologic and epidemiologic considerations. Am J Med 76:172–179. [PubMed][CrossRef]
3. Castor ML, Beach MJ. 2004. Reducing illness transmission from disinfected recreational water venues. Swimming, diarrhea and the emergence of a new public health concern. Pediatr Infect Dis J 23:866–870. [PubMed][CrossRef]
4. Cort WW. 1928. Schistosome dermatitis in the United States (Michigan). JAMA 90:1027–1029. [CrossRef]
5. Hlavsa MC, Roberts VA, Khaler AM, Hilborn ED, Wade TJ, Backer LC, Yoder JS. 2014. Recreational water-associated outbreaks: United States, 2009-2010. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 63:6–10. [PubMed]
6. Katz AR, Buchholz AE, Hinson K, Park Y, Effler P. 2011. Leptospirosis in Hawaii, USA, 1999-2008. Emerg Infect Dis 17:221–226 [PubMed][CrossRef]
7. Schets FM, De Roda Husman AM, Havelaar AH. 2011. Disease outbreaks associated with untreated recreational water use. Epidemiol Infect 139:1114–1125. [PubMed][CrossRef]
8. Winthrop KL, Abrams M, Yakrus M, Schwartz I, Ely J, Gillies D, Vugia DJ. 2002. An outbreak of mycobacterial furunculosis associated with footbaths at a nail salon. N Engl J Med 346:1366–1371. [PubMed][CrossRef]
microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015.citations
cm/3/6
content/journal/microbiolspec/10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015
Loading

Citations loading...

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/microbiolspec/10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015
2015-11-25
2017-06-23

Abstract:

This chapter is unique in its focus on infections that are acquired in water. For those who like to swim and spend time in water parks and pools, the exposure to water and therefore the risk of infection is higher. Recreational water illnesses are illnesses related to recreation in water. Of these recreational water illnesses, infections are the most common because water laden with microorganisms or contaminated by human activity gains access to healthy tissue through the skin and body orifices. Infection occurs by inhalation, ingestion, or direct invasion of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal infections are the most common. This chapter discusses skin and soft tissue infections, ocular infections, urinary tract infections, pulmonary infections, central nervous system infections, and disseminated infections that can occur as people come into contact with natural nonmarine water bodies as well as manmade aquatic environments. Most of these infections are mild but can occasionally be life threatening. There is a focus on the latest methods to treat these infections. is a very common pathogen in water. The chapter discusses dermatitis at length and also looks at keratitis and pneumonia caused by this organism. The chapter also discusses the latest treatments for primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, a severe life-threatening illness with a high mortality, caused by . Finally, there is an in-depth discussion of the notorious gastrointestinal illnesses such as norovirus and that can affect large numbers of people at a time.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

folliculitis. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015.f1

Source: microbiolspec November 2015 vol. 3 no. 6 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

hot-foot syndrome. Courtesy of Fiorillo L, Zucker M, Sawyer D, Lin AN. 2001. The hot-foot syndrome. 335-338. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015.f2

Source: microbiolspec November 2015 vol. 3 no. 6 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 3
FIGURE 3

Schistosome dermatitis. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015.f3

Source: microbiolspec November 2015 vol. 3 no. 6 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 4
FIGURE 4

lesions on the leg of a woman infected at a nail salon. Courtesy of Winthrop KL, Abrams M, Yakrus M, Schwartz I, Ely J, Gillies D, Vugia DJ. 2002. An outbreak of associated with footbaths at a nail salon. 1366-1371. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015.f4

Source: microbiolspec November 2015 vol. 3 no. 6 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 5
FIGURE 5

Onset of the epidemic of at a nail salon. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015.f5

Source: microbiolspec November 2015 vol. 3 no. 6 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 6
FIGURE 6

Incidence per 100,000 population of Cryptosporidiosis, by year between 1995 and 2010. Courtesy of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015.f6

Source: microbiolspec November 2015 vol. 3 no. 6 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 7
FIGURE 7

Number of cryptosporidiosis case reports, by date of symptom onset from 2009 to 2010. Courtesy of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015.f7

Source: microbiolspec November 2015 vol. 3 no. 6 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 8
FIGURE 8

Number of case reports of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, by month of illness onset and probable water exposure in the United States from 1962 to 2014. Courtesy of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015.f8

Source: microbiolspec November 2015 vol. 3 no. 6 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 9
FIGURE 9

Wet mount of trophozoites cultured from the cerebrospinal fluid of a patient with primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) viewed using phase contrast microscopy at a magnification of 600. Courtesy of Capewell LG, Harris AM, Yoder JS, Cope JR, Eddy BA, Roy SL, Visvesvara GS, Fox LM, Beach MJ. 2014. Diagnosis, clinical course, and treatment of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in the United States, 1937–2013. doi:10.1093/jpids/piu103. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015.f9

Source: microbiolspec November 2015 vol. 3 no. 6 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE 1

Infections associated with exposure to freshwater

Source: microbiolspec November 2015 vol. 3 no. 6 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.IOL5-0019-2015

Supplemental Material

No supplementary material available for this content.

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error